Kerr and Merlin Genealogy Pages

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>Jane Hollowell KERR

Jane Hollowell KERR

Female 1824 - 1905  (Age 80)
Person ID: I146 | Tree: Kerr Family  |  Last Modified: 29 Feb 2020


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  • Name Jane Hollowell KERR  [1, 2
    Born 28 Oct 1824  Cornersville, Giles, Tennessee, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 4, 5
    • HILL FAMILY BIBLE:  BIRTHS:  Jane Hallowell HILL, dau of Hugh and Lucy KERR, 28 Oct 1824.

      HILL FAMILY BIBLE II:  FAMILY RECORDS BIRTHS: Jane Hallowell HILL, dau of Hugh & Lucy KERR, 28 Oct 1824.
    Gender Female 
    Died 8 Mar 1905  Austin, Travis, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [5, 6
    • HILL FAMILY BIBLE:  DEATHS:  Jane Hallowell HILL;18 Mar 1905, Austian (sic), TX; aged 80yrs,4mos 20 dys.
    Buried Oakwood Cemetery, Austin, Travis, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 

    Parents

    Family ID: F36 Group Sheet  |  Family Chart  
    Father Hugh P. KERR, Jr. (ID:I134),   b. 29 Oct 1777, Sligo, Connacht, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Jul 1843, Burton, Washington, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65) 
    Mother Lucy Jane Fontaine THOMSON (ID:I135),   b. 24 Mar 1783, Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Oct 1871, Fayetteville, Fayette, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88) 
    Engaged 19 Feb 1806  Augusta, Richmond, Georgia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [29
    • Marriage bond, Hugh Kerr and Lucy Thomson of Warren County, 19 Feb 1806, signed by Hugh Kerr and Asaph Waterman; raised-seal copy notorized by probate clerk 6 Sep 2012.
    Marriage Bond, Hugh Kerr and Lucy Thomson
    Marriage Bond, Hugh Kerr and Lucy Thomson
    Marriage License 19 Feb 1806  Augusta, Richmond, Georgia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [30
    • Marriage license, Hugh Kerr and Lucy Thomson, 19 Feb 1806.
    Hugh Kerr-Lucy Thomson Marriage Certificate
    Marriage License, Hugh Kerr and Lucy Thomson
    Married 27 Feb 1806  Warren, Georgia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [32, 33
    • "In Jackson Hawksby's own handwriting (out of Bible printed in Edinburgh in 1747) and presented by "George Kerr" to "Jackson Hawksby"...Hugh Kerr was born in 29th Oct. 1777 & was married to
      Lucy Thomson 27th Feb. 1806 who was born March
      24th 1783 - they have issue viz, Mary Anne Lewis
      Kerr who was born in Augusta 18th Nov. 1806." [31]
    Hugh Kerr-Lucy Thomson Marriage Certificate
    Hugh Kerr-Lucy Thomson Marriage Certificate

    Family

    Family ID: F37 Group Sheet  |  Family Chart  |  Last Modified: 11 Oct 2018   
    Husband Colonel James Monroe HILL (ID:I148),   b. 13 Mar 1818, Columbus, Muscogee, Georgia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Feb 1904, Austin, Travis, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85) 
    Married 14 Sep 1843  Burton, Washington, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [5, 19, 35, 36
    • Excerpt from The Hill Family of Fayetteville, Typical Texians:  "On September 14, 1843, James Monroe Hill married Jane Hallowell Kerr near the little town of Burton, and thereafter lived near Fayetteville for the next forty-one years, before removing to Austin, and here it was at the family homestead that my own father was born on March 23, 1853, and all of his brothers and sisters: James Leonidas Hill, John William Hill, Homer Barksdale Hill, George Alfred Hill, Lucy Amanda Hill, Mary Elizabeth Hill, Iola Jane Hill, Frank Webb Hill, Nola Hill."

      Excerpt from Hugeunot Bible Records:  "Marriage Certificate:  James Monroe HILL, son of Asa & Elizabeth HILL and Jane Hallowell KERR, dau of Hugh & Lucy KERR at Hermitage, Washington Co, TN the 14 Sep 1843."

      Excerpt from L. W. Kemp biography:  "Married by Rev. O. Fisher".

      From "The Hugh and Lucy Kerr Story":  "Hugh Kerr R. finally returned home to Washington County where he died on 18 July 1843 at or near Burton, Texas. He was 65 years old.  On his last bed of illness he requested his daughter, Jane Hallowell, to not defer her marriage to James Monroe Hill (son of Asa Hill) in case of his death previous to the appointed time, and calling them both to his bedside he placed her hand in his, and game them his blessing.  Their marriage took place 14 Sep 1843." [19, 34]
    Mr. and Mrs. James Monroe Hill
    Mr. and Mrs. James Monroe Hill
    Children 
     

    1. Iola Jane HILL (ID:I165)

     

    2. James Leonidas HILL (ID:I159),   b. 1845,   d. Yes, date unknown

     

    3. John William HILL (ID:I160),   b. 1847, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown

     

    4. Homer Barksdale HILL (ID:I161),   b. 1851,   d. Yes, date unknown

     

    5. George Alfred HILL (ID:I162),   b. 23 Mar 1853, Fayetteville, Fayette, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown

     

    6. Lucy Amanda HILL (ID:I163),   b. 1855,   d. Yes, date unknown

     

    7. Mary Elizabeth HILL (ID:I164),   b. 1858,   d. Yes, date unknown

     

    8. Frank Webb HILL (ID:I166),   b. 1863,   d. Yes, date unknown

     

    9. Nola HILL (ID:I167),   b. 1868,   d. Yes, date unknown

    Other Personal Events

    Residence 1817  Cornersville, Giles, Tennessee, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    • Role: Occupant
    Census 1830  Giles, Tennessee, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    United States Federal 
    • Home in 1830 (City, County, State): Giles, Tennessee, Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9: 1, Free White Persons - Males - 15 thru 19: 2, Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29: 3, Free White Persons - Males - 50 thru 59: 1, Free White Persons - Females - Under 5: 2, Free White Persons - Females - 20 thru 29: 1, Free White Persons - Females - 40 thru 49: 1, Slaves - Males - Under 10: 3, Slaves - Females - 24 thru 35: 1, Free White Persons - Under 20: 5, Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 5, Total Free White Persons: 11, Total Slaves: 4, Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 15.
    • Role: Daughter
    Hugh Kerr Family in 1830 Census
    Hugh Kerr Family in 1830 Census
    Immigration 3 Apr 1830  Harrisburg, Harris, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [9, 10, 11, 12
    from Cornersville, Tennessee 
    • "The Reverend Alfred B. F.  Kerr was born in Giles County, Tennessee, on New Year's Day, 1823, and with his pioneering parents reached Texas in 1831, while it was still a northern province of Mexico. The family settled in present Washington County."

      "In company of about forty other families, they landed at Harrisburg, Texas, on Buffalo Bayou..."
    • Role: Witness
    Founded 1832  Union Hill, Washington, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [13, 14, 15, 16
    Kerr Settlement near Cummins Creek 
    • Texas State Historical Marker:  The Hugh and Lucy Kerr family from Tennessee started the Kerr settlement in this area in 1831. W. B. McClellan (1804-80) from North Carolina bought land from W. P. Kerr in 1844 and began a second settlement. Union Academy was operating by 1850. Union Hill Post Office opened in 1854. Mrs. Lucy Kerr gave acreage at this point for a Methodist church; Masonic lodge and school soon shared the site. Stores, a hotel, and other buildings stood to the west. Unincorporated, the town of 800 dwindled after 1870, as railroad facilities in Burton (2 mi. south) drew away the local businesses.

      From The Hill Family of Fayetteville, Texas:  They were accompanied by  Alexander Thomson, the brother of Lucy Thomson Kerr, and his family, and, in 1832, they each received grants in Austin's colony on the Cummins Creek in what is now Washington County.

      From the 1872 Texas Almanac, Historical Reminiscences of Joel W. Robinson:  In 1833, the Robinson family and Dr. Peebles settled on Cummins Creek, near the Labahia Crossing, on the league of land where Mr. Joel Robinson now lives. This was then on the extreme frontier. Near them was a Mr. Miles. Below them the Alexander settlement, and near the mouth of the creek the Cummins family. Jesse Buruaham and the Ross family lived on the Colorado. Still higher up lived the Rabbs, John H. Moore, John Ingram, J. S. Lester, Demming, Grassmeyer, Zadok Wood, Crafts, Hornsbys, Burlesons, etc., up about Bastrop. At. this time the Indians on the Trinity, who were at peace with the Nacogdochek cölony, were in the habit of depredating on the settlements on the Colorado. In the spring of 1833, the Kechies, who lived on the Trinity: near Robbin's Ferry, made a raid on the Colorado settlements. John York and Stephen Townsend (brother-in-law of Robinson) raised a company of twenty-five men and pursued them. Of those who composed this party, Mr. Robinson thinks the following are still living: G. A. Kerr of Thompsonville, Isbell, McCrockIin, Wilkinson, and perhaps others. The Indians were punished, some eight or ten having been killed, their crops destroyed, and their village broken up.
    • Role: Witness
    Historical Marker in Union HIll, Texas
    Historical Marker in Union HIll, Texas
    Kerr Settlement Structure
    Kerr Settlement Barn
    Rebuilt original Kerr Settlement structure in it's original location, near Union Hill, Texas.
    Stephen F. Austin, Map of Texas (annotated)
    Stephen F. Austin, Map of Texas (annotated)
    "This map once belonged to Hugh and Lucy Kerr, who obtained a land grant from Stephen F. Austin in 1831 and located it east of present-day La Grange, in Fayette County. It is one of the map’s earliest editions, published in 1830 and re-issued many times by Tanner. Rather than purchasing each new addition, Hugh Kerr made small notations on the original map to show where they acquired land...", Stephen F. Austin, Map of Texas with parts of the Adjoining States, Philadelphia: H.S. Tanner, 1830, Map #94440, Frank and Carol Holcomb Digital Map Collection, Archives and Records Program, Texas General Land Office, Austin, TX.
    Union Hill - Last Structure Standing
    Union Hill - Last Building Standing
    This is the only building remaining at the site of what was Kerr Settlement and then Union Hill. It appears to be an old homestead. A document in 1980 claimed that only a well remained at the site but a visitation by my husband and me in the late 1980s revealed one old house near the site. This photo was taken in Sept. of 2010 and this old house is very close to where the Union Hill historical marker is located on FM2780. It may or may not go back to the time of Union Hill. However, the current land owner has been prevented from tearing it down or removing it, by the historical society.
    Education 1840  Rutersville College, Rutersville, Fayette, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [17, 18
    Rutersville College (establishment term) 
    • Noted members and patrons of Rutersville College in it's first year of operation:  Asa C. Hill, Monroe Hill, John C. Hill, Asa Hill, Sarah A. Hill, Mary A. R. Hill, Martha A. E. Hill, Jane H. Kerr, William Kerr, Mary J. A. Kerr, and George Kerr.
    • Role: Classmate
    Residence 15 Oct 1843  Fayetteville, Fayette, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [19
    • Excerpt from The Hill Family of Fayetteville, Typical Texians:  "On September 14, 1843, James Monroe Hill married Jane Hallowell Kerr near the little town of Burton, and thereafter lived near Fayetteville for the next forty-one years, before removing to Austin, and here it was at the family homestead that my own father was born on March 23, 1853, and all of his brothers and sisters: James Leonidas Hill, John William Hill, Homer Barksdale Hill, George Alfred Hill, Lucy Amanda Hill, Mary Elizabeth Hill, Iola Jane Hill, Frank Webb Hill, Nola Hill."
    • Role: Occupant
    Census 10 Sep 1870  Fayetteville, Fayette, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [20
    United States Federal 
    • James' 1870 Census includes a white servant (Texana Moore), [apparently] her child Joseph, and James' mother, Lucy Kerr.

      Dwelling Number: 351, Home in 1870: Precinct 2, Fayette, Texas, Hill, J. M., 52, farmer, Hill, Jane H., 46, keeps house, Hill, James, 25, merchant, Hill, John W., 23, lawyer, Hill, Homer B., 19, Hill, Alfred 17, Hill, Lucy 15, Hill, Mary E., 12, Hill, Frank, 7, Hill, Nola, 2, Moore, Texana, 18, servant, Moore, Joseph, 2, at home, Kerr, Lucy, 87.
    • Role: Household Member
    James Monroe Hill Family in 1870 Census
    James Monroe Hill Family in 1870 Census
    James' 1870 Census includes a white servant (Texana Moore), [apparently] her child Joseph, and James' mother, Lucy Kerr.

    Dwelling Number: 351, Home in 1870: Precinct 2, Fayette, Texas, Hill, J. M., 52, farmer, Hill, Jane H., 46, keeps house, Hill, James, 25, merchant, Hill, John W., 23, lawyer, Hill, Homer B., 19, Hill, Alfred 17, Hill, Lucy 15, Hill, Mary E., 12, Hill, Frank, 7, Hill, Nola, 2, Moore, Texana, 18, servant, Moore, Joseph, 2, at home, Kerr, Lucy, 87.
    Story Millican's Settlement, Republic of Texas Find all individuals with events at this location  [21
    1830: Letter from Alexander Thomson to Stephen F Austin 
    • Summary: Informs Austin of the attempt of Piedras to detain his own and four other families at Nacogdoches in obedience to orders from Terán concerning the law of April 6, 1830. Suggests action by Austin.

      Tenoxtitlan Novr 18th 1830

      Respected sir,

      I am unacquainted with you personally, yet situated as I am, I think it necessary, to address you, and apprise you of a considerable difficulity, that now exist in the settlement of your colony, and the others also; namely, the order from General Teran, to the Colo at Nacogdoches to suffer no person to pass, unless, they have a passport, I was not apprised of that order, and came here, I think on the 28 ultmo'97, the Alcalde informed me when the families came into town I must collect them all together, and present them, I done so, then the Coll, sent for me, and inform'd me that he had the Saturday before recd- the above mentioned order and could not consistent with his order, let me pass, but as we were ignorant of the late Law, and as we had compleatly complyed with the Colonization Law, having our certificates Legally arra[n]ged, by the proper authorities, he would venture to give five of us a permit to you, who he said was authorised to give us passports; but the families must remain until our return, we had traveled better than 8 weeks, had spent a great deal of money, and was much fatigued, we could not feel willing to remain in that part of the country on expences so Long, we therefore came round, which caus'd us to loose 2 1/2 days travel, we are now at the barracks, at Mr Williams that is the families, We arrived there Last night, Today I came up to the new garrison to see the commander here he says that he has recd the same order, and advises us to remain where we are, until he receives further orders in answer to his letter that he had writen after Majr Robertson had inform'd him that I was on the road, which answer he expected would arrive in four days, mean-while he gave us permission to explore the country, which we intend to do immediately'97 Col. Thorn has sent you a letter by me on the subject. We, him and myself think it advisable for you to have an agent appointed in Nacogdoches, he says he is willing to act for you if you wish him, but he expected to start in a day or two for New Orleans and be absent two months, There ought to be some person there authorised immediately, for since I left there I have been informed of two more families that have been stoped, and detain'd,- I have been particular in giving the particulars of my detention, to you, in order, that, you may have a clear view of the impediment, emigrants will meet with in comeing to the colonies'97 So soon as I can, I expect to see you, but can not for a few days,'97 Majr Robertson has inform'd you that I am interested in the settlement of this colony'97

      Alexander Thomson

      [Addressed:] Colo S. F. Austin San Phillipi De Austin

      Source Eugene Barker, ed., Annual Report of the American Historical Association for the Year 1919: The Austin Papers, (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1924), 3 vols., Vol 1, Part 2, pp. 534-535
    Millican Post Office
    Millican Post Office
    Story Fort Tenoxtitlan, Republic of Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [22
    1830: Tenoxtitlan, Dream Capitol of Texas 
    • Nov 1830: These excerpts from the Southwestern Historical Quarterly give credence to the stories surrounding the arrival of the Tennessean families to Texas. They thought the matter of populating the new area was straightforward, only to find out there was an order to stop them:

      "Fort Tenoxtitlan had been in existence only one week when seven Tennesseans rode into town and asked to see Colonel Ruiz. Their leader, a stocky individual with sandy hair and silver spurs, introduced himself as Major Sterling C. Robertson, agent of the Texas Association. Displaying a colonization contract which the association had made with the State of Coahuila and Texas, Major Robertson announced that he had come to explore the country and select the site for a permanent settlement." The primary purpose of Fort Tenoxtitlan, of course, was to stop the immigration of Anglo-Americans into Mexican terri- tory, but Colonel Ruiz was a native Texan, and he had his own ideas about what Texas needed. As he expressed it, " I cannot help seeing the advantages which, to my way of thinking, would result if we admitted honest, hard-working people, regardless of what country they come from, . . even hell itself."" Besides, he liked the Tennesseans, especially after Dr. Thomas J. Wootton, a member of the party, had cured several of his sick soldiers without charging them anything. The Mexicans and the Tennesseans got along harmoniously together, despite the fact that no one in the entire garrison could speak English, and the foreigners knew no Spanish. Ruiz wanted to let them stay, but the law was not clear concerning already existing contracts which were in the process Of cornpletion, so he wrote his superior officer for instructions.

      While the colonel was waiting for a reply, the caravan of fifty immigrants which had been following Major Robertson finally arrived at the Brazos on November 12, 1830, and turned its covered wagons off the Béxar-Nacogdoches Road to camp down the river in the temporary structures which the Mexican garri- son had recently abandoned. Early the next morning Major Robertson rode up to Tenoxtitlan, filed with Colonel Ruiz a formal report on the status of his colonization project, and asked for permission to settle the families in the colony."

      That request set off a chain reaction of official correspondence which produced repercussions in cities as far distant as Matamoros and Leona Vicario (as Saltillo was then called) . Three months later the answer came booming back:

      Give orders to the effect that neither Sterling Robertson nor any other North American family shall be allowed to settle in Tenoxtidan...Turn them over to the Military Commandant of the Town Of Nacogdoches so that he may transport them without fail to the other side of the Sabine...

      To those peremptory commands Ruiz blandly replied that the families had never actually reached his post, that he had no idea where they were, and that the horses at his garrison were in such a "fatal" condition that it would be useless to try to find the immigrants.

      Apparently, the fifty immigrants were never rounded up and escorted beyond the Sabine. They lived for a time in the former Mexican quarters on the Brazos, then moved to permanent homes in other parts of Texas. The heads of families included:

      Isiah Curd, Quintin Dines, James Farmer, Everton Kennerly, George A. Kerr, Henry J. Pair, Jeromiah Tinnin, John Wilson, and Dr. Thomas J. Wootton."

      NOTES:

      1. The "Tennesseans" that arrived are all those that departed from Giles, Tennessee. That means they left there with the full intention of staking claims in Texas.

      2. Notice that George A. Kerr is mentioned as the "head of the family". By previous accounts from Alexander Thomson, Hugh did not accompany the family to Texas immediately; in fact, he remained in New Orleans to attend business while the others caught a steamboat to Houston. Lucy Kerr was often referred to as "Widow Kerr", even while Hugh was alive, due to his being gone so often.
    Fort Tenoxtitlan, Historical Marker
    Fort Tenoxtitlan, Historical Marker
    Story San Felipe de Austin, Republic of Texas Find all individuals with events at this location  [23
    1831: Alexander Thomson to Stephen F Austin 
    • Summary: Arrived in Texas with his own and eight other families and was told at San Felipe that orders had arrived for exclusion of all Americans.

      Texas, Austin's Colony, April 9th 1831

      Dr Sir,

      I am sorry to be compelled to trouble you with a few lines, but necessity forces me to do it, I arrived with my own, and eight more families, on the 2nd Inst, at Harrisburgh, at which place I learned that, the families I had brought out Last fall were ordered below the St Antonio road, and that they had all moved down, the most of them to Mr. Milligan's, I immediately went to St Phillippi, to know the particulars, while there, an order arrived, that all the families, and myself, should return, to the U. S. I at first concluded to go immediately, but all with whom I convers'd, at St Phillippi advised me to wait, and pe[ti]tion for priviledge to remain in this colony, and become a settler here, I have arranged all my business in the U. S. and came with view to become a permanent residentor in this country, and have sacrificed much, and underwent a great deal of fatigue, and trouble, to get here, if we have to return, it will break us all prety well.

      I anticipated no such difficulties, or I never should have engaged in the business, but remain'd where I was well settled in Tennessee.

      As I believe it is in your power to do more with the government, and with Genl Teran, than any one else, and believing that you are dispos'd to be friendly toward us, I now take the liberty to request you, to intercede for us in any way your discretion, may point out, and that as soon as you can, for I will not be able to know what to do until I hear from you. If I am obliged to return the sooner I know it the better, or if I am permitted to remain, I wish to be trying to settle myself, if I can remain, I wish to settle in the uper part of your colony.

      Any attention paid to my situation by you, will be greatfully acknowledged, now is the time, sir, for you to do me, perhaps a greater kindness, than you may ever have an opportunity to do me again.

      Alexr Thomson

      N. B. until I hear my destiny, I expect to recide in the settlement of Mr Milligan.

      [Addressed:] Colo S. F. Austin, Diputado Leona Vicario. Att of Majr Reynolds

      Source
      Eugene Barker, ed., Annual Report of the American Historical Association for the Year 1919: The Austin Papers, (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1924), 3 vols., Vol 1, Part 2, pp. 642-643
    Story Union Hill, Washington, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [24
    1831: The Kerr Family in the Texas Frontier - A Brother's Perspective 
    • [Note written across the top of the first page, in another handwriting] Families equipped out in his own means.

      Austin's Coly.

      My Dear Son,

      Through the kind providence of our merciful god, we all arrived here safe, on the 2nd Inst. on my arrival, I learned that all of the families that I had settled in our colony, were ordered across the line, and that they had moved down to Mr. Williams. As soon as I could get my family a little sheltered, which I done the next morning, I immediately put off for St. Phillippe [San Felipe de Austin] to assertain the particulars...

      The families suffered much by sea sickness, we had a very rough sea, and aII sick enough, even the crew was sick. I kept up and one or two more, we had our hands full attending to the sick, we left N. Orleans on friday about 12 oCIock, and arrived here on the next day week about one oclock, since our arrival the most of the families , and the inhabitance of the Town have been sick with the Dysentary, some are now very bad off with it, I have it myself... I went from St. Phillipi, to Milligan's [Millican's] and brought down my waggon and horses, and expect to start on the day after tomorrow, for the uper end of this, (Austin's) Colony, where I expcect to stop and see how matters will go, I have difficulty and fatigue, but I hope I some rest, and ease, it will take us about 10 days to go up, we have had some heavy rains, which has made the roads bad, should it be fair a few days they will be pretty good...John Kerr is still very poorly, if his Lax was stopd, I think he would be much better than he was before the voye [voyage] as his stomach was prety well clens'd,...he desires me to give his love to you. Mr. Kerr remain'd in Orleans,...I shall stop writing now, and, perhaps just before I leave here I shall finish,...May 1st, 1831, we arrived here on Last evening. I am now going up about 20 miles above Milligan, and stop on a vacant League, and plant a little corn, and choose a place during the summer,...

      Signed,
      Alexr Thomson
    Replica of Austin's Cabin, San Felipe de Austin
    Replica of Austin's Cabin, San Felipe de Austin
    Story Union Hill, Washington, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [25
    1831: The Kerr Family in the Texas Frontier - A Daughter's Prespective 
    • Written in her own hand, Mrs. Jane Hallowell Kerr Hill, daughter Of Hugh and Lucy, relates her early experiences in moving and living in Texas. She was about 6 1/2 years old vhen the family left Tennessee.

      "My parents, Hugh and Lucy Kerr, came to Texas in 1831 with Alexander Thomson, my mother's only brother. We traveled by steamboat to New Orleans, then took passage on a schooner and (as well as I remember) were 14 days crossing the Gulf. We landed at Harrisburg, Texas where we remained a few weeks. We then went to a place where the town of Millican now is, and afterwards located in Washington County; having only one neighbor nearer than twelve miles of us.

      In the year 1836 we vere in the "Runaway Scrape" as it was then called, fleeing from Santa Ana's army. It was thought that they would overrun the whole country, sparing none. We had a terrible time travelling through mud and water, as it rained most of the time. Some of the rivers were more than three miles wide, vhich we had to cross in small ferryboats all through the bottoms, or valleys. We kept on until within twenty-five miles of the Sabine river, stopping at San Augustine.

      We remained there until the next fall, for we were afraid to return to our home sooner on account of Indians. Our first year spent in the new home, before we had had time to raise corn, we often were deprived of having bread; at one time for three veeks.

      The Indians were friendly then, and a party of them camped by a spring near our house. They used to hunt and would share their game with us; and, knowing that we were without bread at this time, they went off some distance to buy cornmeal. On their return they divided the small quantity they had with my mother, who at once had the cook to make some bread, and with tears in her eyes she divided among the children, both white and black, not tasting herself .

      Not long after our return from San Augustine the Indians stole two horses from us, (the men being absent at the time) and my small brother (Alfred Fontaine) and I kept watch throughout the next night. The negroes had to work in the daytime preparing for the support of the family, for we had been robbed of nearly everything we had left when fled the Mexicans. My mother had to sell a half-lague of land to buy a team and wagon before we could move back, as we had to leave ours, and the cattle we had started with, on account of the high waters.

      Mother was so distressed when she heard of the fall of the Alamo that she only took one trunk, some bedding and provisions, leaving a good supply of everything at home. On our return we only found most of the books. The Mexican army had camped within five miles of our house and burned the fence rails to make their fires. Whole families had been captured and killed not far from where we had lived.

      Both Crockett and Travis spent one night at my mother's home when on their way to San Antonio. I remember well how they looked. What a pleasure it was to entertain those who came to defend us.
    David Crockett
    David Crockett
    Houseguest of the Kerr Family in 1831.
    William Travis
    William Travis
    Houseguest of the Kerr Family in 1831.
    Runaway Scrape
    Runaway Scrape
    Depiction of the Runaway Scrape.
    Story Union Hill, Washington, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [26
    1831: The Kerr Family in the Texas Frontier - A Grandchild's Recolleciton 
    • As told by George A. Hill, in "The Hill Family of Texas: Typical Texians":

      Prior to this time, my great-grandfather and great-grandmother, Hugh Kerr and Lucy Thomson Kerr, were residing near Cornersville, Tennessee. This town was near Fayetteville in the adjoining county of Lincoln and not far distant from the town of La Grange in Fayette County, Tennessee. Hugh Kerr was the son of Hugh Kerr, Sr., and was born in Sligo, Ireland, and Lucy Thomson was the daughter of Alexander Thomson, Sr. She was of Scotch, English and French descent, the last mentioned lineage being through John de la Fontaine, who settled in Virginia in 1716. Hugh Kerr was a friend of Andrew Jackson, and he and his wife, Lucy Thomson Kerr, had learned a great deal about Texas from Alexander Thomson, who was an assistant empresario of Sterling Robertson's colony, contemporaneously known as the Nashville colony. In 1831, they decided to emigrate [sic.] to Texas with those who were then surviving of their nine children, viz:

      Mary Anne Lewis Kerr; George Alexander Kerr; Augustus Kerr; William Penn Kerr; Alfred Benjamin F. Kerr; Jane Hallowell Kerr (Mrs. James Monroe Hill); Amanda Julia Kerr (who married Rev. H. S. Thrall).

      They embarked on a steamboat on the Tennessee River and followed it to its junction with the Mississippi River and proceeded thence to New Orleans, where they transshipped to a schooner, and finally disembarked at Harrisburg in the Fall of 1831. They were accompanied by Alexander Thomson, the brother of Lucy Thomson Kerr, and his family, and, in 1832, they each received grants in Austin's colony on the Cummings Creek in what is now Washington County.

      The trials and vicissitudes of frontier life produced meager earnings, and Hugh Kerr accepted the position given him by Andrew Jackson as collector of customs at the port of New Orleans to supplement the income from farm and stock raising, and was in New Orleans in the momentous days of the Spring of 1836, when the young republic was experiencing its birth.

      The Kerrs were devout Methodists, and Alexander Thomson was a lay preacher, and the first Methodist Sunday School held in the province of Texas is reputed (page 70 of "Texas Colonists and Religion, 1821-1836" by Wm. Stuart Red) to have been held at Kerr's settlement in the home of my great grandmother, Lucy Thomson Kerr, with Alexander Thomson officiating. In the Texas Christian Advocate of Jan. 16, 1908, there is an account of the proceedings of the Texas Conference Missionary Society held at Rutersville on December 28, 1840, and the journal records the presence of 13 members of the Hill family, 8 of the Kerr family and 10 of the Thomson family out of less than 100 in attendance at this historic gathering.

      Both Crockett and Travis spent one night in the Kerr home when on their way to San Antonio, but the Kerr family had to flee soon thereafter behind the retreating army of General Houston with an innumerable host of women and children in the great hegira known in that day as "The Runaway Scrape."

      After the victory at San Jacinto, the Hill and the Kerr families returned to more normal pursuits, but Indian depredations made life on this frontier a matter of constantly recurring hazards. Unorganized as well as organized Indian warfare was a matter of great frequency.
    Story Rutersville College, Rutersville, Fayette, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [27
    1840: Rutersville College, Hills and Kerrs 
    • "One of the great problems in the daily life of my great-grandparents and of others resident in this community was the continuance of the appropriate education of their children, and therefore they welcomed and supported the Rutersville College, which was organized near by in honor of the Reverend Martin Ruter, one of the first Methodist missionaries who had been sent to Texas. Through the energetic zeal of Reverend Chauncey Richardson, a charter was obtained for Rutersville College from the Republic of Texas, with a donation by the Congress of the Republic of four leagues of land for the benefit of the college. The Reverend Chauncey Richardson became its first president. It is very interesting to me to note that the roster of this college, for its first term, included the following children of Asa and Elizabeth Hill, viz.:

      Monroe Hill (James Monroe Hill);
      Asa Collingsworth Hill;
      John C. Hill;
      Sarah Anne Hill;
      Mary Anne Rebecca Hill;
      Martha Anne Eliza Hill;
      Susanna Amanda Hill;
      Louisiana Elizabeth Hill;

      And also, a little Mexican fifer boy captured at San Jacinto by my grandfather, James Monroe Hill, and whose name was Joseph Mendes. This little Mexican boy was offered the option of returning to Mexico, but he expressed a decided preference for remaining in Texas, and he lived with and was educated by Asa and Elizabeth Hill.

      My great-grandparents, Hugh and Lucy Kerr, also had, in the first enrollment in Rutersville College, the following children:

      Jane H. Kerr (afterwards, Mrs. James Monroe Hill);
      Mary J. A. Kerr;
      George Kerr;

      And also their cousins,

      J. N. McD. Thomson and
      Susan C. Thomson,
      Children of Alexander Thomson.

      J. N. McD. Thomson was a member of the ill-fated Mier Expedition in 1842, of whom more will be recounted later.

      The enrollment of Rutersville College for the years 1840 was reproduced in the Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association in October 1898, in Volume II, Number 2, on pages 124-125, and the catalogue and enrollment for the year 1841 is photostatically reproduced on pages 46-47 of the Texas Methodist Centennial Year Book, (1834-1934) together with photographs of the old college building during the period that it was Rutersville College, and later when it became the Texas Military Institute.

      I now possess, and have read with great interest, a copy of the diary of my great-uncle, the Reverend A. B. F. Kerr, during the period of time when he was acting as agent for Rutersville College in 1849-52, and this daily journal of his travels as circuit rider and agent for the college is intensely interesting. He began the journal with this inscription:

      "This book is to register my daily deeds and actions. O! May I not do anything of which I would be ashamed to record.
      "As yet, I have accomplished but little; may the Lord direct and guide me successfully for Christ's sake."
    Rutersville College
    Rutersville College
    RUTERSVILLE COLLEGE FOUNDED IN 1840 This was the first Protestant and Methodist school founded in Texas and was located near La Grange, Texas, and was named in honor of Martin Ruter who came to Texas as a missionary in 1837 and died May 16, 1838. RUTERSVILLE COLLEGE FOUNDED IN 1840
    This was the first Protestant and Methodist school founded in Texas and
    was located near La Grange, Texas, and was named in honor of Martin
    Ruter who came to Texas as a missionary in 1837 and died May 16, 1838.
    Story Union Hill, Washington, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [28
    1866: Lucy Kerr's Last Years at the Kerr Settlement 
    • "She (Lucy Kerr) could not live alone, so papa and mama lived with her. Papa looked after the plantation until uncle Thrall (Homer S. Thrall, husband of Lucy's daughter Amanda Julia Kerr) was sent to Galveston as presiding Elder. Mama then persuaded papa to buy their home as their family was increasing so rapidly. Grandma was a wonderful woman. we all adored her. Aunt Amanda Thrall died (July 1851) in Galveston and uncle Thrall brought the body back to be interred in the Old family cemetery on grandma 's place or near there. When grandmother's large home and negro quarters burned, papa built her a smaller place where she lived until aunt Jane (Jane Hallowell Kerr Hill) induced her to come and live with her and uncle Monroe (James Monroe Hill). She was then getting feeble. When she went to Fayetteville, uncle Agustus (Lucy's son) and aunt "Pency" came to live on his mother's place. They remained there until they too, began to grow feeble; they then went to live with their son, our beloved cousin Monroe and cousin Mollie".

      After the death of her husband, Lucy continued to live at the Kerr Settlement until 1866. Lucy was now 83 years old, had reared a family and laid to rest her husband. Lucy then moved to Fayette County, Texas to live with her only surviving daughter, Jane Hallowell Kerr Hill, the wife of James Monroe Hill. Lucy died at the Hill residence on 1 October 1871, age 88 years, 6 months and 6 days. Lucy Kerr was buried in the "Kerr " cemetery, which is located in a dense thicket one'97half mile east of F . M. 1697 and about three'97fourths of a mile north Of Union Hill. Only four grave stones remain; one marking Lucy Kerr's grave."...The Hugh and Lucy Kerr Story, page 15.
    Siblings
    1. Mary Ann Fontaine KERR,   b. 18 Nov 1806, Augusta, Richmond, Georgia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Feb 1865, Washington, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
     
    2. John KERR,   b. 20 Sep 1808, Warren, Georgia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Apr 1832
     
    3. Lewis KERR,   b. 20 Sep 1808, Warren, Georgia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Aug 1831
     
    4. George Alexander KERR,   b. 5 Jul 1810, Augusta, Richmond, Georgia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 May 1893, Waelder, Gonzales, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
     
    5. Augustus Thomson KERR,   b. 16 Jun 1812, Augusta, Richmond, Georgia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Feb 1880
     
    6. William Penn KERR,   b. 10 Jul 1814, Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Jul 1901, Kansas City, Jackson, Missouri, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
     
    7. Rev. Alfred Benjamin Fontaine KERR,   b. 1 Jan 1823, Cornersville, Giles, Tennessee, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Nov 1881, San Marcos, Hays, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
     
    8. Amanda Julia KERR,   b. 16 Oct 1826, Cornersville, Giles, Tennessee, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Jul 1851, Galveston, Galveston, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
     
  • Event Map

    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1817 - Cornersville, Giles, Tennessee, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 28 Oct 1824 - Cornersville, Giles, Tennessee, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1830 - Giles, Tennessee, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsImmigration - 3 Apr 1830 - Harrisburg, Harris, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsFounded - 1832 - Union Hill, Washington, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsEducation - 1840 - Rutersville College, Rutersville, Fayette, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 14 Sep 1843 - Burton, Washington, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 15 Oct 1843 - Fayetteville, Fayette, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 10 Sep 1870 - Fayetteville, Fayette, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 8 Mar 1905 - Austin, Travis, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Oakwood Cemetery, Austin, Travis, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsStory - - Millican's Settlement, Republic of Texas Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsStory - - Fort Tenoxtitlan, Republic of Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsStory - - San Felipe de Austin, Republic of Texas Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsStory - - Union Hill, Washington, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsStory - - Union Hill, Washington, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsStory - - Union Hill, Washington, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsStory - - Rutersville College, Rutersville, Fayette, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsStory - - Union Hill, Washington, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
     : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set
  • Photos
    Jane Hollowell Kerr Hill
    Jane Hollowell Kerr Hill

  • Source Citations

    1. [S90] Dallas Morning News, Texas. Dallas., "Another Pioneer Gone," 11 May 1893, p. 6, col. 3. (Reliability: 4), 7 Oct 2017.
      Another Pioneer Gone, Waelder, May 9 -- George A. Kerr, after a few days of intense suffering, died here at 12:06 o'clock to-day from old age and a complication of diseases and his remains will be laid to rest in the Waelder cemetery to-morroow at 3 o'clock p.m. after appropriate funeral services commencing at 2 o'clock p.m.  "Grandpa" Durr, as he was familliarly known, was born in Augusta, Ga, July 5, 1810.  He went from Georgia to Tennessee when a small boy and was reared in the latter state under the influence of Christian parents and became a member of the M. E. church at 18 years of age.  He subsequently came from Tennessee to Washington County, Texas, in 1830 and was happily married to Miss Serena P. Hill of said county in 1837.  He lived in Fayette county and moved from there to Gonzales county in 1856, locating at Thompsonville, and from there to Waelder in 1881.  The subject of this sketch was one of the pioneers of Texas, having served in may Indian campaigns during an early day.  He was in the Gonzales fight, also the "grass fight" at San Antanio.  He led a strictly moral and religious life and was the father of a happy family.  His wife and four children survive him.  The latter are Mrs. Mary J. Johnson of Fayette county, Mrs. Lucy Thompson of AUstin, Mrs. Virginia Hubert and J. L. Kerr of this (Gonzales) county.  The lamented Dr. G. W. Kerr and J. B. Kerr were his sons.  "Grandpa" Kerr was honored and loved by all who knew him.  He leaves a host of relatives and friends in sad bereavement.
      George Alexander Kerr Obituary
      George Alexander Kerr Obituary


    2. [S24] Find A Grave, (http://www.findagrave.com: 2016), accessed 19 Jan 2018, Lucy Fontaine Kerr, 48290634. (Reliability: 4), 19 Jan 2018.
      Name: Lucy Fontaine Kerr, Maiden Name: Thomson, Birth Date: 24 Mar 1783, Death Date: 1 Oct 1871, Cemetery: Kerr Cemetery, Burial or Cremation Place: Burton, Washington County, Texas, United States of America, Father: Alexander Cromwell Thomson, Mother: Lucy Thomson, Children: Alfred Benjamin Kerr , William Penn Kerr, Jane Hallowell Hill , Augustus Thomson Kerr , George Alexander Kerr.
      Lucy Jane Fontaine Thomson Kerr Grave
      Lucy Jane Fontaine Thomson Kerr Grave
      Name: Lucy Fontaine Kerr, Maiden Name: Thomson, Birth Date: 24 Mar 1783, Death Date: 1 Oct 1871, Cemetery: Kerr Cemetery, Burial or Cremation Place: Burton, Washington County, Texas, United States of America, Father: Alexander Cromwell Thomson, Mother: Lucy Thomson, Children: Alfred Benjamin Kerr , William Penn Kerr, Jane Hallowell Hill , Augustus Thomson Kerr , George Alexander Kerr.


    3. [S80] Huguenot Society Bible Records, Arthur Louis Finnell, editor, (1996; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2002.), 340. (Reliability: 4), 1 Oct 2017.
      HILL FAMILY BIBLE:  BIRTHS:  Jane Hallowell HILL, dau of Hugh and Lucy KERR, 28 Oct 1824.
      Hugeunot Bible Records, Page 340
      Huguenot Bible Records, Page 340


    4. [S80] Huguenot Society Bible Records, Arthur Louis Finnell, editor, (1996; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2002.), 341. (Reliability: 4), 1 Oct 2017.
      HILL FAMILY BIBLE II:  FAMILY RECORDS BIRTHS: Jane Hallowell HILL, dau of Hugh & Lucy KERR, 28 Oct 1824.
      Huguenot Bible Records, Page 341
      Huguenot Bible Records, Page 341


    5. [S241] Kerr, Hugh and Lucy, Story, Althea Anne Lokey Kelly, (Dallas, Texas: Daughters of the Republic of Texas, 1993.), R929.20973., 21 of 31. (Reliability: 4), 11 Oct 2018.

    6. [S80] Huguenot Society Bible Records, Arthur Louis Finnell, editor, (1996; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2002.), 341. (Reliability: 4), 1 Oct 2017.
      HILL FAMILY BIBLE:  DEATHS:  Jane Hallowell HILL;18 Mar 1905, Austian (sic), TX; aged 80yrs,4mos 20 dys.
      Huguenot Bible Records, Page 341
      Huguenot Bible Records, Page 341


    7. [S88] Kerr Clan of New Jersey, William Clinton Armstrong, (Morrison, Illinois: Shawver Publishing Company, 1985.), 135-136. (Reliability: 4), 6 Oct 2017.
      This Sketch of the Descendants of Hugh Kerr, Jr., 1773-1866, Was Compiled by Mrs. Margaret Kerr Ingraham, and Has Been Edited by Miss Minnie Nickum.
      Kerr Clan of New Jersey, Page 136
      Kerr Clan of New Jersey, Page 136


    8. [S87] Census-Tennessee-Giles-1830, Tennessee, Giles, (http:\\www.ancestry.com: National Archives and Records Administration, 2010), M19, roll 176, p. 145, line 1, Hugh Kerr, accessed 6 Oct 2017 (Reliability: 4), 6 Oct 2017.
      Home in 1830 (City, County, State): Giles, Tennessee, Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9:      1, Free White Persons - Males - 15 thru 19: 2, Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29: 3, Free White Persons - Males - 50 thru 59: 1, Free White Persons - Females - Under 5: 2, Free White Persons - Females - 20 thru 29: 1, Free White Persons - Females - 40 thru 49: 1, Slaves - Males - Under 10: 3, Slaves - Females - 24 thru 35: 1, Free White Persons - Under 20: 5, Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 5, Total Free White Persons: 11, Total Slaves: 4, Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 15.
      citing Fifth Census of the United States, 1830. (NARA microfilm publication M19, 201 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.
      Hugh Kerr Family in 1830 Census
      Hugh Kerr Family in 1830 Census


    9. [S76] First United Methodist Church, San Marcos, Al Lowman, (San Marcos, Texas: San Marcos Record Press, 1972.), BX8481.S424 L68 1972., 7. (Reliability: 4), 28 Sep 2017.
      The Reverend Alfred B. F. Kerr served the San Marcos Methodist Church for the first two years of its existence. Kerr was born in Giles County, Tennessee, on New Year's Day, 1823, and with his pioneering parents reached Texas in 1831, while it was still a northern province of Mexico. The family settled in present Washington County.
      San Maros Methodist Church 125th Anniversary Program
      San Maros Methodist Church 125th Anniversary Program


    10. [S88] Kerr Clan of New Jersey, William Clinton Armstrong, (Morrison, Illinois: Shawver Publishing Company, 1985.), 135-136. (Reliability: 4), 6 Oct 2017.
      This Sketch of the Descendants of Hugh Kerr, Jr., 1773-1866, Was Compiled by Mrs. Margaret Kerr Ingraham, and Has Been Edited by Miss Minnie Nickum.
      Kerr Clan of New Jersey, Page 136
      Kerr Clan of New Jersey, Page 136


    11. [S111] Washington County Genealogical Society, Washington County Genealogical Society., Lucy Kerr, Kerr Cemetery (Reliability: 4).
      Kerr Cemetery: On private property near the Christian Cemetery -- Map #158. Only four stones remain in a dense thicket one half mile east of FM 1697. about ¾ mile north of Union Hill. Latitude 30°12'45", longitude 96°36'43". Kerr, Lucy, b. Mar 24, 1783, d. Oct 31, 1871.
      Kerr Cemetery Description
      Kerr Cemetery Description
      Provided by Washington County TX Genealogical Society


    12. [S241] Kerr, Hugh and Lucy, Story, Althea Anne Lokey Kelly, (Dallas, Texas: Daughters of the Republic of Texas, 1993.), R929.20973., 5. (Reliability: 4), 2 Feb 2018.

    13. [S88] Kerr Clan of New Jersey, William Clinton Armstrong, (Morrison, Illinois: Shawver Publishing Company, 1985.), 135-136. (Reliability: 4), 6 Oct 2017.
      This Sketch of the Descendants of Hugh Kerr, Jr., 1773-1866, Was Compiled by Mrs. Margaret Kerr Ingraham, and Has Been Edited by Miss Minnie Nickum.
      Kerr Clan of New Jersey, Page 136
      Kerr Clan of New Jersey, Page 136


    14. [S75] Hill Family of Fayetteville, Typical Texians, George A. Hill, Details of Kerr settlement in Texas. (Reliability: 4), 8 Oct 2017.
      They were accompanied by  Alexander Thomson, the brother of Lucy Thomson Kerr, and his family, and, in 1832, they each received grants in Austin's colony on the Cummings Creek in what is now Washington County.

    15. [S96] Texas Almanac for 1872 and Emmigrant's Guide to Texas, (Galveston, Texas: Richardson & Company, 1872.), 164. (Reliability: 3), 8 Oct 2017.
      G. A. Kerr mentioned in reminiscences of Joel W. Robinson.
      G. A. Kerr in Historical Reminiscences of Cummins Creek
      G. A. Kerr in Historical Reminiscences of Cummins Creek


    16. [S111] Washington County Genealogical Society, Washington County Genealogical Society., Lucy Kerr, Kerr Cemetery (Reliability: 4).
      Kerr Cemetery: On private property near the Christian Cemetery -- Map #158. Only four stones remain in a dense thicket one half mile east of FM 1697. about ¾ mile north of Union Hill. Latitude 30°12'45", longitude 96°36'43". Kerr, Lucy, b. Mar 24, 1783, d. Oct 31, 1871.
      Kerr Cemetery Description
      Kerr Cemetery Description
      Provided by Washington County TX Genealogical Society


    17. [S85] Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Julia Lee Sinks, "Rutersville College," (October 1898). (Reliability: 4), 3 Oct 2017.
      Rutersville College
      Rutersville College


    18. [S78] Handbook of Texas Online, (https://tshaonline.org.), Joseph Blanton, "HILL, ASA COLLINSWORTH," online handbook (https://tshaonline.org : accessed 22 Sep 2019), http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fhiwv. (Reliability: 4), 22 Sep 2019.
      citing Handbook of Texas Online, Joseph E. Blanton, "HILL, ASA COLLINSWORTH," accessed September 19, 2019, http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fhiwv.

    19. [S75] Hill Family of Fayetteville, Typical Texians, George A. Hill, 65-142, Hill and Kerr history in Fayetteville, Texas. (Reliability: 3), 28 Sep 2017.
      On September 14, 1843, James Monroe Hill married Jane Hallowell Kerr near the little town of Burton, and thereafter lived near Fayetteville for the next forty-one years, before removing to Austin, and here it was at the family homestead that my own father was born on March 23, 1853, and all of his brothers and sisters: James Leonidas Hill, John William Hill, Homer Barksdale Hill, George Alfred Hill, Lucy Amanda Hill, Mary Elizabeth Hill, Iola Jane Hill, Frank Webb Hill, Nola Hill.

    20. [S267] Census-Texas-Fayette-1870, Texas, Fayette, (http://www.ancestry.com: National Archives and Records Administration, 2009), M593, roll M593_1585, Fayetteville, p. 58, dwelling 351, family 351, J. M. Hill family, accessed 20 Jan 2018 (Reliability: 4), 20 Jan 2018.
      Dwelling Number: 351, Home in 1870: Precinct 2, Fayette, Texas, Hill, J. M., 52, farmer, Hill, Jane H., 46, keeps house, Hill, James, 25, merchant, Hill, John W., 23, lawyer, Hill, Homer B., 19, Hill, Alfred 17, Hill, Lucy 15, Hill, Mary E., 12, Hill, Frank, 7, Hill, Nola, 2, Moore, Texana, 18, servant, Moore, Joseph, 2, at home, Kerr, Lucy, 87.
      citing 1870 U.S. census, population schedules. NARA microfilm publication M593, 1,761 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.
      James Monroe Hill Family in 1870 Census
      James Monroe Hill Family in 1870 Census
      James' 1870 Census includes a white servant (Texana Moore), [apparently] her child Joseph, and James' mother, Lucy Kerr.

      Dwelling Number: 351, Home in 1870: Precinct 2, Fayette, Texas, Hill, J. M., 52, farmer, Hill, Jane H., 46, keeps house, Hill, James, 25, merchant, Hill, John W., 23, lawyer, Hill, Homer B., 19, Hill, Alfred 17, Hill, Lucy 15, Hill, Mary E., 12, Hill, Frank, 7, Hill, Nola, 2, Moore, Texana, 18, servant, Moore, Joseph, 2, at home, Kerr, Lucy, 87.


    21. [S288] Annual Report of the American Historical Association, Eugene Barker, ed, (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1924), 3 vols., Vol 1, Part 2, pp. 534-535 (Reliability: 4), 2 Feb 2018.
      Alexander Thomson to Stephen F Austin, 11-13-1830; Summary: Informs Austin of the attempt of Piedras to detain his own and four other families at Nacogdoches in obedience to orders from Terán concerning the law of April 6, 1830. Suggests action by Austin.

    22. [S289] Papers Concerning Robertson's Colony in Texas, Malcolm D. McLean, editor, (Dallas, Texas: University of Texas Arlington Library, 1913.), IV: 27-30. (Reliability: 4).
      Tenoxititlan, Dream Capital of Texas

    23. [S288] Annual Report of the American Historical Association, Eugene Barker, ed, (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1924), 3 vols., Vol 1, Part 2, pp. 642-643 (Reliability: 4), 2 Feb 2018.
      Alexander Thomson to Stephen F Austin, 04-09-1831

    24. [S241] Kerr, Hugh and Lucy, Story, Althea Anne Lokey Kelly, (Dallas, Texas: Daughters of the Republic of Texas, 1993.), R929.20973., 6-7. (Reliability: 4).

    25. [S241] Kerr, Hugh and Lucy, Story, Althea Anne Lokey Kelly, (Dallas, Texas: Daughters of the Republic of Texas, 1993.), R929.20973., 3-4. (Reliability: 4).

    26. [S75] Hill Family of Fayetteville, Typical Texians, George A. Hill, Immigration details of Kerr family from Tennessee to Texas. (Reliability: 4), 28 Sep 2017.
      The Hill Family of Fayetteville, Typical Texians
      Hill Family Fayette County, Typical Texians
      George A. Hill, Jr. of Houston, Texas delivered the following address at Fayetteville on December 9, 1936, at the dedication of a Centennial monument erected by the State of Texas.


    27. [S75] Hill Family of Fayetteville, Typical Texians, George A. Hill, Rutersville College. (Reliability: 4), 3 Oct 2017.
      ...a charter was obtained for Rutersville College from the Republic of Texas.

    28. [S241] Kerr, Hugh and Lucy, Story, Althea Anne Lokey Kelly, (Dallas, Texas: Daughters of the Republic of Texas, 1993.), R929.20973., 15. (Reliability: 4).

    29. [S112] Kerr Hugh-Marriage-1806, Georgia. Warren., marriage bond (1806), Kerr-Thomson. (Reliability: 4), 15 Oct 2017.
      Marriage bond, Hugh Kerr and Lucy Thomson of Warren County, 19 Feb 1806, signed by Hugh Kerr and Asaph Waterman; raised-seal copy notorized by probate clerk 6 Sep 2012.
      Marriage Bond, Hugh Kerr and Lucy Thomson
      Marriage Bond, Hugh Kerr and Lucy Thomson


    30. [S112] Kerr Hugh-Marriage-1806, Georgia. Warren., marriage bond (1806), Kerr-Thomson. (Reliability: 4), 15 Oct 2017.
      Marriage license, Hugh Kerr and Lucy Thomson, 19 Feb 1806.
      Marriage Bond, Hugh Kerr and Lucy Thomson
      Marriage Bond, Hugh Kerr and Lucy Thomson


    31. [S86] Sligo Families Histories, Cairncross C. Downey, (New York: n.p., 1931.), 153-154. (Reliability: 4), 4 Oct 2017.
      Hugh Kerr was born in 29th Oct. 1777 & was married to Lucy Thomson 27th Feb. 1806 who was born March 24th 1783 -they have issue viz, Mary Anne Lewis Kerr who was born in Augusta 18th Nov. 1806.
      Sligo Family Geneologies, Page 154
      Sligo Family Geneologies, Page 154


    32. [S112] Kerr Hugh-Marriage-1806, Georgia. Warren., marriage certificate no. not numbered (1806), Kerr-Thomson. (Reliability: 4), 15 Oct 2017.
      Richmond County, Georgia Certificate of Matrimony between Hugh Kerr and Lucy Thomson of Warren County, Georgia.  Authorization 19 Feb 1806; ceremony 27 Feb 1906.  Copy certified 6 Sep 2012.
      Hugh Kerr-Lucy Thomson Marriage Certificate
      Hugh Kerr-Lucy Thomson Marriage Certificate


    33. [S241] Kerr, Hugh and Lucy, Story, Althea Anne Lokey Kelly, (Dallas, Texas: Daughters of the Republic of Texas, 1993.), R929.20973., 1. (Reliability: 4), 1 Jan 2018.

    34. [S80] Huguenot Society Bible Records, Arthur Louis Finnell, editor, (1996; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2002.), 339-342. (Reliability: 4), 1 Oct 2017.
      Marriage Certificate:  James Monroe HILL, son of Asa & Elizabeth HILL and Jane Hallowell KERR, dau of Hugh & Lucy KERR at Hermitage, Washington Co, TN the 14 Sep 1843.
      Huguenot Bible Records, Page 339
      Huguenot Bible Records, Page 339


    35. [S80] Huguenot Society Bible Records, Arthur Louis Finnell, editor, (1996; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2002.), 339-342. (Reliability: 4), 1 Oct 2017.
      HILL FAMILY BIBLE:  Marriage Certificate:  James Monroe HILL, son of Asa & Elizabeth HILL and Jane Hallowell KERR, dau of Hugh & Lucy KERR at Hermitage, Washington Co, TN the 14 Sep 1843.
      Huguenot Bible Records, Page 339
      Huguenot Bible Records, Page 339


    36. [S175] San Jacinto Museum, San Jacinto Museum of History, (http://www.sanjacinto-museum.org : 2017), accessed 23 Nov 2017), James Monroe Hill (Reliability: 4), 23 Nov 2017.
      James Monroe Hill - San Jacinto Museum Statistics
      James Monroe Hill - San Jacinto Museum Statistics



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