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>Colonel James Monroe HILL

Colonel James Monroe HILL

Male 1818 - 1904  (Age 85)
Person ID: I148 | Tree: Kerr Family  |  Last Modified: 29 Feb 2020


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  • Name James Monroe HILL  [1
    Prefix Colonel 
    Born 13 Mar 1818  Columbus, Muscogee, Georgia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3, 4, 5
    • HILL FAMILY BIBLE:  BIRTHS:  James Monroe HILL, son of Asa & Elizabeth HILL, 13 Mar 1818.

      HILL FAMILY BIBLE II:  FAMILY RECORDS BIRTHS:  James Monroe HILL, son of Asa & Elizabeth HILL, 13 Mar 1818.
    Gender Male 
    Died 14 Feb 1904  Austin, Travis, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [6, 7
    • HILL FAMILY BIBLE:  DEATHS:  James Monroe HILL, 14 Feb 1904, Austin, TX; aged 85yrs 11mos 1day.
    Buried Oakwood Cemetery, Austin, Travis, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [8

    Parents

    Family ID: F44 Group Sheet  |  Family Chart  
    Father Abraham Webb "Asa" HILL (ID:I171),   b. 1784, Edgecombe, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Jul 1844, Bastrop, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 60) 
    Mother Elizabeth BARKSDALE (ID:I855),   b. 3 Jan 1796, Georgia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Jan 1883, Waelder, Gonzales, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87) 
    Married 6 Oct 1808  Hancock, Georgia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [28, 29
    • "The family moved to Georgia about the years 1800, and founded the little town of Hillsboro, which was not far distant from the town of Fayetteville in Fayette County, and La Grange in Troup County, and it was there that he met and married Elizabeth Barksdale." [28]

    Family

    Family ID: F37 Group Sheet  |  Family Chart  |  Last Modified: 11 Oct 2018   
    Wife Jane Hollowell KERR (ID:I146),   b. 28 Oct 1824, Cornersville, Giles, Tennessee, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Mar 1905, Austin, Travis, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80) 
    Married 14 Sep 1843  Burton, Washington, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [7, 17, 31, 32
    • Excerpt from The Hill Family of Fayetteville, Typical Texians:  "On September 14, 1843, James Monroe Hill married Jane Hallowell Kerr near the little town of Burton, and thereafter lived near Fayetteville for the next forty-one years, before removing to Austin, and here it was at the family homestead that my own father was born on March 23, 1853, and all of his brothers and sisters: James Leonidas Hill, John William Hill, Homer Barksdale Hill, George Alfred Hill, Lucy Amanda Hill, Mary Elizabeth Hill, Iola Jane Hill, Frank Webb Hill, Nola Hill."

      Excerpt from Hugeunot Bible Records:  "Marriage Certificate:  James Monroe HILL, son of Asa & Elizabeth HILL and Jane Hallowell KERR, dau of Hugh & Lucy KERR at Hermitage, Washington Co, TN the 14 Sep 1843."

      Excerpt from L. W. Kemp biography:  "Married by Rev. O. Fisher".

      From "The Hugh and Lucy Kerr Story":  "Hugh Kerr R. finally returned home to Washington County where he died on 18 July 1843 at or near Burton, Texas. He was 65 years old.  On his last bed of illness he requested his daughter, Jane Hallowell, to not defer her marriage to James Monroe Hill (son of Asa Hill) in case of his death previous to the appointed time, and calling them both to his bedside he placed her hand in his, and game them his blessing.  Their marriage took place 14 Sep 1843." [17, 30]
    Mr. and Mrs. James Monroe Hill
    Mr. and Mrs. James Monroe Hill
    Children 
     

    1. Iola Jane HILL (ID:I165)

     

    2. James Leonidas HILL (ID:I159),   b. 1845,   d. Yes, date unknown

     

    3. John William HILL (ID:I160),   b. 1847, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown

     

    4. Homer Barksdale HILL (ID:I161),   b. 1851,   d. Yes, date unknown

     

    5. George Alfred HILL (ID:I162),   b. 23 Mar 1853, Fayetteville, Fayette, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown

     

    6. Lucy Amanda HILL (ID:I163),   b. 1855,   d. Yes, date unknown

     

    7. Mary Elizabeth HILL (ID:I164),   b. 1858,   d. Yes, date unknown

     

    8. Frank Webb HILL (ID:I166),   b. 1863,   d. Yes, date unknown

     

    9. Nola HILL (ID:I167),   b. 1868,   d. Yes, date unknown

    Other Personal Events

    Immigration 1834  Gay Hill, Washington, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [9, 10, 11, 12
    from Hillsboro, Georgia 
    • "In 1834, my great-grandfather, Asa Hill, accompanied by one son, William Carroll Andrew Jackson Hill, and his nephew, Isaac Lafayette Hill, journeyed to Texas, and selected a place for settlement in Austin's colony near Gay Hill, and then returned to Georgia to arrange for the removal of his family to Texas. The return voyage commenced at Columbus, Georgia, by steamboat on the Chattahoochee River to the port of Appalachicola, where the party reembarked on a schooner for New Orleans, by way of Mobile. At the port of New Orleans, a sailing vessel was employed for crossing the Gulf of Mexico, and, after a voyage of eighteen days, they reached the little port of Matagorda on Matagorda Bay. Ox wagons furnished the vehicles for travel from Matagorda to San Felipe, which was then the seat of the provincial government, and thence on to Gay Hill, which journey occupied seven days of travel.
    • Role: Witness
    Military 11 Apr 1836  Washington, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [13
    Member of Captain William W. Hill's Company 
    • Enlisted by Captain Joseph P. Lynch at the home of Asa Mitchell.

      Company commander:  Lieut. Robert Stevenson

      Rank:  Private.
    James Monroe Hill - San Jacinto Museum Statistics
    James Monroe Hill - Statistics from San Jacinto Museum
    Land 1838  Washington, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [14
    (320 acres) for having served in the army from 1 Mar to 13 May 1836 
    Land 10 Jul 1838  Washington, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [15
    (640 acres) issued to him for having participated in the Battle of San Jacinto 
    Education 1840  Rutersville College, Rutersville, Fayette, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [12, 16
    Rutersville College (establishment term) 
    • Noted members and patrons of Rutersville College in it's first year of operation:  Asa C. Hill, Monroe Hill, John C. Hill, Asa Hill, Sarah A. Hill, Mary A. R. Hill, Martha A. E. Hill, Jane H. Kerr, William Kerr, Mary J. A. Kerr, and George Kerr.
    • Role: Classmate
    Residence 15 Oct 1843  Fayetteville, Fayette, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [17
    • Excerpt from The Hill Family of Fayetteville, Typical Texians:  "On September 14, 1843, James Monroe Hill married Jane Hallowell Kerr near the little town of Burton, and thereafter lived near Fayetteville for the next forty-one years, before removing to Austin, and here it was at the family homestead that my own father was born on March 23, 1853, and all of his brothers and sisters: James Leonidas Hill, John William Hill, Homer Barksdale Hill, George Alfred Hill, Lucy Amanda Hill, Mary Elizabeth Hill, Iola Jane Hill, Frank Webb Hill, Nola Hill."
    Occupation 1870  Fayetteville, Fayette, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [18
    Farmer 
    Census 10 Sep 1870  Fayetteville, Fayette, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [19
    United States Federal 
    • James' 1870 Census includes a white servant (Texana Moore), [apparently] her child Joseph, and James' mother, Lucy Kerr.

      Dwelling Number: 351, Home in 1870: Precinct 2, Fayette, Texas, Hill, J. M., 52, farmer, Hill, Jane H., 46, keeps house, Hill, James, 25, merchant, Hill, John W., 23, lawyer, Hill, Homer B., 19, Hill, Alfred 17, Hill, Lucy 15, Hill, Mary E., 12, Hill, Frank, 7, Hill, Nola, 2, Moore, Texana, 18, servant, Moore, Joseph, 2, at home, Kerr, Lucy, 87.
    James Monroe Hill Family in 1870 Census
    James Monroe Hill Family in 1870 Census
    James' 1870 Census includes a white servant (Texana Moore), [apparently] her child Joseph, and James' mother, Lucy Kerr.

    Dwelling Number: 351, Home in 1870: Precinct 2, Fayette, Texas, Hill, J. M., 52, farmer, Hill, Jane H., 46, keeps house, Hill, James, 25, merchant, Hill, John W., 23, lawyer, Hill, Homer B., 19, Hill, Alfred 17, Hill, Lucy 15, Hill, Mary E., 12, Hill, Frank, 7, Hill, Nola, 2, Moore, Texana, 18, servant, Moore, Joseph, 2, at home, Kerr, Lucy, 87.
    Membership 1873  La Porte, Harris, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [20
    Texas Veterans Association 
    Membership 1902  La Porte, Harris, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    President, Texas Veterans Association 
    Obituary 22 Oct 1903  Houston, Harris, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [21
    Houston Chronical and Herald 
    • Mrs. Kerr Dead.  Waelder, Texas, Oct 22.--Mrs. Sarena Kerr, known by her friends as Grandma Kerr, died of old age yesterday and her remains were interred in the Waelder cemetery today.  Deceased was the sister of James Monroe Hill of Austin, Texas, and Dr. J. C. C. Hill of Monterey, Mexico.
    • Role: Witness
    'Mrs. Kerr Dead' -- Serena P. Hill Kerr Obituary
    "Mrs. Kerr Dead" -- Serena P. Hill Kerr Obituary
    Obituary 1904  Fayetteville, Fayette, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [22
    The Fayetteville Daily 
    James Monroe Hill, Obituary
    James Monroe Hill, Obituary
    Transcription from the original news clipping in the Fayetteville Daily.
    Story Houston, Harris, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [23, 24
    1836: Colonel James Monroe Hill's Account of the Battle of San Jacinto 
    • Excerpt from a letter sent from James Monroe to help facilitate the acquisition of land for a National Park and monument recognizing San Jacinto veterans:

      From San Jacinto Veteran James Monroe Hill 1894. AUSTIN, TEX, June 22.---Noticing in The Post a list of the survivors of the Battle of San Jacinto and the probable visit of a number of them to the famous grounds on the Fourth of July, for the purpose of designating same incident to their purchase by the State, the writer called upon Col. James M. Hill, chairman of the committee charged with the duty above mentioned, and also a member of Houston's army at the time of that memorable engagement. The following interesting incidents pertaining to the battle were gleaned from him. They are, in brief, the actual experiences of Colonel Hill from the time he joined the army on the Colorado River to and after the Battle of San Jacinto:

      I left the family homestead near Independence, Washington County, in a party of nine, composed of my father, Asa Hill, Nicholas Whitehead, Scates, Chas. Williams and others, and joined Houston on the Colorado River at Columbus, on the north side of the river. Houston, with his army, had crossed the river some 12 miles above at Bunshams Crossing, on his retreat from Gonzales. Shortly after my arrival a division of Santa Anna's army confronted Houston at Columbus. A small detachment of Houston's men crossed and engaged the Mexicans in a skirmish, without casualties. I was attached to a detachment of about 300 to hold the ford just north of the town. Houston got information that the main Mexican Army was crossing the Colorado River some 15 or 20 miles below, at what was called the Tusky Seat crossing with the evident object of surrounding the army of Houston and getting between them and their families. On getting this information Houston took up his line of march east for the Brazos at San Felipe, where we camped the following night. Next day we marched up the Brazos River, crossing Mill Creek, and camped, and on the following day continued up the river, opposite Donahoe's, where the army remained in camp 12 days. The Brazos was very high and no means were obtainable to cross.

      A messenger was sent to Washington to have the steamboat Yellowstone come down and aid the army in crossing. Houston left at San Felipe Captain Baker's company to guard that crossing. They crossed and encamped on the east side and remained until the main army crossed at Donahoe's, when they were notified and joined them. My recollection is that Captain Baker's company brought the two cannon, Twin Sisters, up with him to Donahoe's, which was the first time Houston had them. The steamboat Yellowstone was used to cross the Brazos. No incident of consequence transpired during the 12 days in camp, except one notable desertion from the Regular Army. The party was caught, court-martialed, and sentenced to be shot. The grave was dug and all preliminaries arranged to carry into execution the sentence, when Houston pardoned him. He afterward became a brave and daring soldier and did valiant service.

      After the Yellowstone had finished crossing the army at Donohoe's she proceeded down the river loaded with cotton; in passing San Felipe the Mexicans who occupied the east bank made a heroic and novel attempt to capture her. She was riddled with bullets and an effort made to lariat her, but she passed in safety as they were well protected by cotton bales. The day the army took up the march east from Donohoe's, the road being almost impassable, the wagons became bogged and progress was very slow and difficult. One very commendable incident is treasured to the credit of General Houston, who left his horse and lent a helping hand at the wheel when the wagons were in the bog. His sympathy and earnest assistance was ever present with the soldiers, which doubtless contributed to the wonderful influence lie possessed over his men. The trip from the Brazos to Buffalo Bayou opposite Harrisburg was made by continuous march, when the army went into camp. Upon our arrival we found that the Mexicans had burned Harrisburg and their trail indicated that they had continued their march east toward Galveston Bay. The opportunity that Houston planned presented itself soon after encamping on the bayou. Deaf Smith captured a courier of Felisol's or Urea's army, I forget which, who bore important dispatches that revealed the position of the various Mexican armies and the whereabouts of Santa Anna and his mission to the bay, which was to capture President Burnett, who at the time was residing on the East Bay. This attempt at capture came very near proving successful, as President Burnett escaped in an open boat with some ladies on the approach of the Mexicans.

      I will not attempt to give anything like an accurate statement of anything that did not occur of my own knowledge and of which I was not personally cognizant. Soon after the capture of the courier and a short consultation between Houston, Rusk, and Deaf Smith, Houston had the army drawn up in a hollow square and made them a speech, which, in brief, was that the time had arrived and as the men had been wanting to fight an opportunity presented itself. Santa Anna with his army was located and he intended to engage him. He told them that the battle cry should be "Remember the Alamo."

      General Rusk followed Houston eloquently, urging them to let the battle cry be "Remember the Alamo," "Remember Labadie." The soldiers were dismissed to procure 3 days' rations, with knapsacks, guns, and ammunition. Captain McNutt, with his company, was detailed to remain at camp, and a detail of 10 men from the left of each company was announced would be made to remain in camp. When the command to 'fall in' was given a regular scramble and rush was made to get in line to save the detail. The eagerness to engage the Mexicans was so intense that great feeling was manifested among all the army. Those that were slow in getting into line comprised the bulk of the detail. No time was lost from the capture of the Mexican courier until arrangements were consummated to commence the march to intercept and engage Santa Anna's army. This was in the evening. Buffalo Bayou was crossed to the south side about 1 mile below Harrisburg on a small leaky boat, which would hold about 1 dozen. It was with great difficulty the boat could be kept afloat, had to keep bailing constantly to do so. A rope was extended from bank to bank and the trips were made back and forth with great rapidity. Rations were very scarce and to give one an idea of each man's supply I give the following as my allowance for the 3 days---1 small rib chop of beef, partially cooked, which did not last me through the night; 1 pint of flour. The bayou was crossed and the army took up the march toward the bay about dusk. They marched all night and halted about 1 hour just before daylight, when they continued until about 9 o'clock, when they halted for 15 minutes. News arrived that our spies had intercepted theirs, when orders were given to continue the march. An amusing effort was made by the worn and hungry soldiers to get something to eat during this small stop. I depended upon my flint, steel, and punk to get a spark of fire and then dry grass with the burning punk passed rapidly through the air to create a blaze.

      I hurriedly poured a little flour into my gourd and wet it and put the dough around a stick and thrust it into the fire when the command "March" was given. We continued until the Mexicans were sighted and were seen to be approaching; this was on the morning of the 20th of April about 10 o'clock. Houston took up a position on the bayou near the spot that the killed were buried and which is commonly supposed to be the spot where the main battle was fought. The Mexicans advanced to within a few hundred yards, where they planted their cannon, a 9-pounder, and commenced a fierce cannonading between their gun and our Twin Sisters, small 4-pound guns under command of Colonel Neal. During this engagement Colonel Neal was wounded very extraordinarily, a full account of which has been published. The Mexicans after a time withdrew and went into camp at a point about 1 mile distant, between San Jacinto River and a small bayou. During the afternoon the Mexican Cavalry engaged our Cavalry between the two armies in quite a lively skirmish. In this engagement Gen. W. P. Law then a private soldier, was knocked off his horse and was daringly rescued by Gen. M. B. Lamar. The bravery of General Lamar on this occasion was highly commended by General Houston and his popularity and promotion followed this incident. The night was spent in expectancy, both armies being supposed to be ready for action. The hungry soldiers of Houston's army made the best they could by catching crabs. However, this supply was only sufficient to whet the appetite of the soldiers.

      The following day, the 21st the morning was spent anticipating an attack from the Mexicans. They in the meantime were building breastworks. Commencing near the point of timber next the river, brush was used, then blankets and apparatus, pack saddles and camp equipage for some distance into the prairie, which sufficed for the protection of the entire army. Their cannon was planted near a little tree at the southern end of their breastworks, some distance out in the prairie. About noon Cos' division, about 600 strong, reinforced Santa Anna. Houston dispatched Deaf Smith to burn the bridge over Vincents Bayou and made arrangements to attack Santa Anna. About 3 o'clock in the evening the army advanced to make the attack, with Sherman's division to the left next the river, Burleson's in the center, Willard's to the right, and Lamar's Cavalry on the extreme right. The Twin Sisters were next to my company in Burleson's regiment. The march was at a rapid pace from start until we were within about 400 yards, when the command was given to double quick. The Mexicans opened fire as quick as we came in sight and continued by platoons. We ran up within 80 yards and halted and at the command "each get your man" we fired, and nearly decimated their ranks. Our aim was effective and the distance so close our fire carried death and dismay to the Mexicans. We were yelling at the top of our voices "Remember the Alamo," "Labadie", etc. We carried the rifle balls in our mouths and loaded our flint-lock rifles with great rapidity. After our first deadly volley the Mexicans became demoralized and commenced retreating. The officers tried in vain to rally them, but each succeeding fire did such destruction that the officers' efforts were in vain and a general stampede ensued.

      After this every man in our Army, so far as I was able to judge, was his own commander. We followed them across the boggy run, which was so full of dead we crossed without miring, stepping from one to another. We continued pursuit of them down to the neck of land between San Jacinto River and McCormick Lake. When many tried to swim across the run to the marsh on the other side. Our deadly rifles and unerring aim ended the existence of all that made the attempt; but few of those remained to tell the tale. The Cavalry to the extreme right captured most of the prisoners. The firing continued until nearly night. The estimated number killed was about 1,500. In answer to our yell, "Remember the Alamol" "Remember Labadie" the Mexicans would say, "Me no Alamo" "Me no Labadie" but the memory of those recent butcheries were too fresh in our minds and the excitement of the occasion was not such as to arouse our sympathy.

      We returned through the Mexican camp after our pursuit and witnessed large quantities of beef stewing in large iron kettles, which was very tempting to our hungry and almost famished Army, but a rumor became current that it had been poisoned and we foolishly let it alone and went hungry. It has been stated that Deaf Smith ran down the lines shouting that "the bridge was burned, fight for your lives." Nothing of the kind occurred. The only man who rode down our line during the time of the advance was Colonel Somerville, who bore in order from General Houston, shouting, "Passed the word to Sherman to hurry up his command." When we commenced yelling nothing was audible but such words as "Go it, my, brave boys." Officers as well as men were doing execution and the result tells the tale.

      After visiting the grounds with my old comrades, I will give you some other data that may be of interest to some of your readers. I hope the good people of Houston will render our committee the necessary facilities to visit the battlegrounds and consummate our mission. We want to present the matter to the legislature in a tangible and businesslike way and have no doubt that the purchase will be made and an appropriation requisite to beautify the same.

      July 5, 1894. ON HISTORIC GROUND---VETERANS' VISIT TO SAN JACINTO BATTLEFIELD---THE TRIP DOWN BUFFALO BAYOU---REMINISCENCES OF THE FAMOUS BATTLE AND OF ITS CHIEF ACTORS---LOCATING THE BATTLEFIELD

      The battlefield of San. Jacinto. What a flood of memories of other days and other men the sight of that famous spot must have awakened in the bosoms of that little band of survivors of the battle who viewed it yesterday. With one exception not one of them had been to the battlefield since the day after that famous engagement in which Texas at one lump attained her independence and the men who fought there carved for themselves a monument in American history more lasting and resplendent than either marble or brass. The object of the visit to the battlefield by a committee of the survivors of the battle was in obedience to a resolution passed at the Waco meeting of the Texas veterans to designate the exact location of the battle and gather other data with a view to a purchase by the State of this famous ground. Through the generosity and thoughtfulness of Maj. James Converse, who offered the use of his swift and beautiful steam yacht, the Boston, the veterans were enabled to make the trip with comfort, ease, and pleasure.

      In connection with the trip of the veterans, San Jacinto chapter, Daughters of the. Republic, which organization has taken the initiative in the patriotic work of attempting to rescue from vandalism all the sacred spots in Texas history, had arranged for a general excursion. The general excursion left an hour later than the Boston with its load of veterans, and it proved to be a popular idea. It was in charge of Capt. John H. Gray and the steamer Eugene, with barges in tow, was crowded with excursionists. The Boston left its wharf at the foot of Fannin Street with the following on board:

      Col. James M. Hill, of Austin, chairman of the veterans' committee to visit the battlefield; L. C. Cunningham, of Waelder, J. W. McHorse, of Leander, Williamson County, J. W. Winters, of Big Foot, Frio County, J. M. Harbour, of Killeen, Bell County
    Asa Hill
    Asa Hill, with San Jacinto Veterans
    Asa is second from the left, seated on the bench.
    Asa Hill, with San Jacinto Veterans
    Asa Hill, with San Jacinto Veterans
    In this photo taken at the last reunion in 1906 of the old veterans in front of the Presidio La Bahia, William A. Pettus of Goliad (standing left) and six wives are shown in addition to the old Texian veterans (left to right) Asa Hill, S.F. Sparks, Alphonso Steele, W.P. Zuber, L.T. Lawlor and J.W. Darlington. W.A. Pettus (b. 1839) was the son of Texian veteran John Freeman Pettus.  (From 300 Years in Victoria County by Roy Grimes, original photo in the McNamara-O'Connor Museum)
    James Monroe Hill (bottom, second from left)
    James Monroe Hill (bottom, second from left)
    Photo of old Texian veterans that was taken by Houston photographer, Samuel Anderson.  Veterans were escorted on a tour of the San Jacinto battleground by members of San Jacinto Chapter/Daughters of the Republic of Texas in 1894 for the purpose of describing in detail what took place during the battle. According to Nancy Burch, current 2004 member San Jacinto Chapter Daughters of the Republic of Texas whose great grandmother, Maggie Houston Williams, was on the tour, veterans L.C. Cunningham (1810-1896), J.R. Fenn (1824-1904), James M. Harbour, James M. Hill (1818-1905), F.R. Lubbock (1815-1905), John W. McHorse (1819-1897), Henry McCulloch (1816-1895), S.F. Sparks (1819-1908) and J.W. Winters (1819-1903) attended.  Sion Bostick is sitting left,  James Washington Winters Jr. is at front row center, on his left is James Monroe Hill.  John McHorse is standing third from left and on his left is Texas governor Francis R. Lubbock. (Contributed by Winters descendant, Lori Richman)
    Story Washington, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [25
    1836: Hill's in the Fight for Texas Independence 
    • "The clearing of land for farming, the erection of a dwelling house, and all of the preparations for farming and stock raising were progressing apace, when news by courier arrived of the siege of the Alamo. Asa Hill and his son, William Carroll Andrew Jackson Hill, at once joined an expedition for the relief of the garrison at the Alamo, but were unable to reach San Antonio before its fall. They did, however, witness on this expedition the burning of Gonzales.

      During the absence of Asa Hill on this expedition my grandfather, James Monroe Hill, and his younger brothers and sisters were busily engaged in moulding and patching bullets for use in the reception of Santa Anna's army, reports of the invasion of which had spread throughout the length and breadth of the colony; and so immediately upon his return, Asa Hill and his son, James Monroe Hill, and seven others, started in search of General Sam Houston, who had been empowered, upon the declaration of independence of the Republic of Texas on March 2, 1836, to raise an army of defense, Houston's trail was [encountered] at Burnam's Crossing on the Colorado River, and contact was soon made with a detachment of his army near Columbus who were guarding the ford of the river.

      James Monroe Hill enlisted in Captain W. W. Hill's company at this point, and Asa Hill proceeded down the Colorado River to report to General Houston. He was detailed by General Houston to contact all families in the colony west of the Brazos and to warn them to hasten to cross the Brazos and fall behind the protecting cover of Houston's army, which was being organized for a strategic retreat before the approaching enemy under General Santa Anna.

      The rest of this episode is familiar and notable history.

      James Monroe Hill continued with Houston's army and was one of those of extreme youth who served valiantly in the battle that won for Texas its indepence. In his later years he served as President of the San Jacinto Veterans' Association, was importantly intrumental in inducing the State of Texas to purchase the battlefield as a State memorial park, and served as the chairman of the commission appointed by Governor Culberson to locate and effectuate the purchase of the battlefield by the Stae of Texas. In this work he was ably assisted by my father, George A. Hill, Sr., who served as the secretary of the commission appointed by Governor Culberson for such purpose."
    Story Union Hill, Washington, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [26
    1866: Lucy Kerr's Last Years at the Kerr Settlement 
    • "She (Lucy Kerr) could not live alone, so papa and mama lived with her. Papa looked after the plantation until uncle Thrall (Homer S. Thrall, husband of Lucy's daughter Amanda Julia Kerr) was sent to Galveston as presiding Elder. Mama then persuaded papa to buy their home as their family was increasing so rapidly. Grandma was a wonderful woman. we all adored her. Aunt Amanda Thrall died (July 1851) in Galveston and uncle Thrall brought the body back to be interred in the Old family cemetery on grandma 's place or near there. When grandmother's large home and negro quarters burned, papa built her a smaller place where she lived until aunt Jane (Jane Hallowell Kerr Hill) induced her to come and live with her and uncle Monroe (James Monroe Hill). She was then getting feeble. When she went to Fayetteville, uncle Agustus (Lucy's son) and aunt "Pency" came to live on his mother's place. They remained there until they too, began to grow feeble; they then went to live with their son, our beloved cousin Monroe and cousin Mollie".

      After the death of her husband, Lucy continued to live at the Kerr Settlement until 1866. Lucy was now 83 years old, had reared a family and laid to rest her husband. Lucy then moved to Fayette County, Texas to live with her only surviving daughter, Jane Hallowell Kerr Hill, the wife of James Monroe Hill. Lucy died at the Hill residence on 1 October 1871, age 88 years, 6 months and 6 days. Lucy Kerr was buried in the "Kerr " cemetery, which is located in a dense thicket one'97half mile east of F . M. 1697 and about three'97fourths of a mile north Of Union Hill. Only four grave stones remain; one marking Lucy Kerr's grave."...The Hugh and Lucy Kerr Story, page 15.
    Story La Porte, Harris, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [27
    1873-1907: Texas Veterans Association 
    • TEXAS VETERANS ASSOCIATION. The Texas Veterans Association, an organization of those who had served prior to, during, and immediately after the Texas Revolution, held its first convention in Houston on May 13, 1873, with about seventy-five veterans present. Edwin Wallerby presided; Moses Austin Bryan acted as secretary; the committee on constitution and bylaws included Jerome B. Robertson, William P. Hardeman, Ashbel Smith, Walter P. Lane, William T. Austin, and Francis R. Lubbock. Under the constitution, members of the association were divided into three classes. The first class included surviving members of the Old Three Hundred and soldiers, seamen, and citizens who could produce proof of service in Texas between 1820 and October 15, 1836. The second class included soldiers and seamen who could produce proof of service at any time between October 15, 1836, and November 1, 1837. The third class included soldiers and seamen who had proof of service between November 1, 1837, and annexation in 1845. The original officers, Francis W. Johnson, president, William J. Russell, first vice president, Walter P. Lane, second vice president, and Moses Austin Bryan, secretary, were elected on May 14, 1873, and were reelected annually until 1884, when because of the death of Johnson, Lane became president. Lane was succeeded as president by Guy M. Bryan in 1892; James Monroe Hill became president in 1902, and Stephen F. Sparks was elected in 1904. Stephen H. Darden succeeded Moses Austin Bryan as secretary in 1886 and served until 1902, when F. R. Lubbock became secretary-treasurer. After 1876 the annual meetings, held in some seventeen different Texas cities, always took place in the week including April 21, San Jacinto Day. At the Goliad meeting in 1906 only six of the last ten known survivors of the Army of the Republic of Texas were present: William P. Zuber, Alfonso Steele, John W. Darlington, Asa C. Hill, S. F. Sparks, and L. T. Lawlor. The association dissolved in Austin on April 19, 1907, during its thirty-fifth annual convention. With its dissolution its work was taken over by the Daughters of the Republic of Texas.
    Abraham Webb Hill
    Abraham Webb Hill
    San Jancinto Veterans; Texas Veterans Association
    Asa Hill
    Asa Hill
    San Jacinto Veterans; Texas Veterans Association
    Asa Hill, with San Jacinto Veterans
    Asa Hill, with San Jacinto Veterans
    In this photo taken at the last reunion in 1906 of the old veterans in front of the Presidio La Bahia, William A. Pettus of Goliad (standing left) and six wives are shown in addition to the old Texian veterans (left to right) Asa Hill, S.F. Sparks, Alphonso Steele, W.P. Zuber, L.T. Lawlor and J.W. Darlington. W.A. Pettus (b. 1839) was the son of Texian veteran John Freeman Pettus.  (From 300 Years in Victoria County by Roy Grimes, original photo in the McNamara-O'Connor Museum)
    Isaac Lafayette Hill
    Isaac Lafayette Hill
    San Jancinto Veterans; Texas Veterans Association
    James Monroe Hill
    James Monroe Hill
    San Jancinto Veterans; Texas Veterans Association
    James Monroe Hill (bottom, second from left)
    James Monroe Hill (bottom, second from left)
    Photo of old Texian veterans that was taken by Houston photographer, Samuel Anderson.  Veterans were escorted on a tour of the San Jacinto battleground by members of San Jacinto Chapter/Daughters of the Republic of Texas in 1894 for the purpose of describing in detail what took place during the battle. According to Nancy Burch, current 2004 member San Jacinto Chapter Daughters of the Republic of Texas whose great grandmother, Maggie Houston Williams, was on the tour, veterans L.C. Cunningham (1810-1896), J.R. Fenn (1824-1904), James M. Harbour, James M. Hill (1818-1905), F.R. Lubbock (1815-1905), John W. McHorse (1819-1897), Henry McCulloch (1816-1895), S.F. Sparks (1819-1908) and J.W. Winters (1819-1903) attended.  Sion Bostick is sitting left,  James Washington Winters Jr. is at front row center, on his left is James Monroe Hill.  John McHorse is standing third from left and on his left is Texas governor Francis R. Lubbock. (Contributed by Winters descendant, Lori Richman)
    San Jacinto Reunion
    San Jacinto Reunion
    Photograph of several men gathered for the veteran reunion of the Battle of San Jacinto of 1836. Behind the men are several buildings and horse drawn carriages. This photo was taken at the Texas Veterans Association annual convention in Belton in 1883.
    Galveston, TX:  San Jacinto Vet Reunion
    San Jacinto Veterans Reunion, Galveston, TX
    San Jacinto Veterans - Asa C. Hill
    San Jacinto Veterans - Asa C. Hill
    Veterans of Mexican War - 1836. Photograph by C. A. Major, 1906. Left to right: William P. Zuber, J. W. Darlington, Asa C. Hill, Stephen F. Sparks, L. T. Lawlor, and Alfonso Steele.
    San Jacinto Veterans
    San Jacinto Veterans
    Veterans of San Jacinto, by P. R. Rose, 1879. Note that although the men pictured were all members of the Texas Veterans Association, they were not all present at San Jacinto
    Siblings
    1. Dr. Green Washington HILL,   bur. Old La Grange City Cemetery, La Grange, Fayette, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
     
    2. William Carroll Andrew Jackson HILL,   d. Yes, date unknown
     
    3. Jeffrey Barksdale HILL,   d. Yes, date unknown
     
    4. Susanna Amanda Hill HILL,   d. Yes, date unknown
     
    5. Mary Anne Rebecca HILL,   d. Yes, date unknown
     
    6. Sarah Anne Amelia HILL,   d. Yes, date unknown
     
    7. Martha Anne Eliza HILL,   d. Yes, date unknown
     
    8. Serena Pinkney HILL,   b. 19 Sep 1821, Putnam, Georgia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Oct 1903, Waelder, Gonzales, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
     
    9. Elizabeth Louisa Anna "Louisiana" HILL,   b. 5 Feb 1824, Putnam, Georgia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Nov 1882, Waelder, Gonzales, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
     
    10. Asa Collingsworth "Colley" HILL,   b. 26 Nov 1826, Hillsboro, Baldwin, Georgia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Oct 1913, Beeville, Bee, Texas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
     
    11. John Christopher Columbus HILL,   b. 15 Nov 1828, Columbus, Muscogee, Georgia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1904
     
  • Event Map

    Link to Google MapsBorn - 13 Mar 1818 - Columbus, Muscogee, Georgia, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsImmigration - 1834 - Gay Hill, Washington, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMilitary - 11 Apr 1836 - Washington, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLand - 1838 - Washington, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLand - 10 Jul 1838 - Washington, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsEducation - 1840 - Rutersville College, Rutersville, Fayette, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 14 Sep 1843 - Burton, Washington, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 15 Oct 1843 - Fayetteville, Fayette, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - 1870 - Fayetteville, Fayette, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 10 Sep 1870 - Fayetteville, Fayette, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMembership - 1873 - La Porte, Harris, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMembership - 1902 - La Porte, Harris, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsObituary - 22 Oct 1903 - Houston, Harris, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsObituary - 1904 - Fayetteville, Fayette, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 14 Feb 1904 - Austin, Travis, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Oakwood Cemetery, Austin, Travis, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsStory - - Houston, Harris, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsStory - - Washington, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsStory - - Union Hill, Washington, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsStory - - La Porte, Harris, Texas, United States Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
     : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set
  • Photos
    James Monroe Hill and Unnamed Son
    James Monroe Hill
    James Monroe Hill
    James Monroe Hill (bottom, second from left)

  • Source Citations

    1. [S24] Find A Grave, (http://www.findagrave.com: 2016), accessed 10 Oct 2017, Serena Pinkney Hill, 155515331. (Reliability: 4), 10 Oct 2017.
      Birth: Sep. 19, 1821, Putnam County, Georgia, USA, Death:  Oct. 21, 1903, Waelder, Gonzales County, Texas, USA, Parents: Asa Hill (1784 - 1844), Elizabeth Barksdale Hill Thomson (1796 - 1883), Spouse: George Alexander Kerr (1810 - 1893) Children: John L. Kerr (1849 - 1922)*, Siblings: Green Washington Hill (1812 - 1844)*, William Carroll Jackson Hill (1814 - 1897)*, Jeffrey Barksdale Hill (1814 - 1901)*, James Monroe Hill (1818 - 1904)*, Louise E Hill Kerr (1824 - 1882)*, John Christopher Columbus Hill (1827 - 1904)*, Mary Annie Rebecca Hill Shaw (1830 - 1905)*, Sarah Ann Amelia Hill Webb (1832 - 1883)*, *Calculated relationship, Burial: Waelder Cemetery , Waelder, Gonzales County, Texas, USA, Created by: TMHuebner, Record added: Nov 29, 2015, Find A Grave Memorial# 155515331.
      Serena Pinkney Hill Kerr FindAGrave Source
      Serena Pinkney Hill Kerr FindAGrave Source


    2. [S80] Huguenot Society Bible Records, Arthur Louis Finnell, editor, (1996; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2002.), 339-340. (Reliability: 4), 1 Oct 2017.
      HILL FAMILY BIBLE:  BIRTHS:  James Monroe HILL, son of Asa & Elizabeth HILL, 13 Mar 1818.
      Huguenot Bible Records, Page 339
      Huguenot Bible Records, Page 339
      Hugeunot Bible Records, Page 340
      Hugeunot Bible Records, Page 340


    3. [S80] Huguenot Society Bible Records, Arthur Louis Finnell, editor, (1996; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2002.), 341. (Reliability: 4), 1 Oct 2017.
      HILL FAMILY BIBLE II:  FAMILY RECORDS BIRTHS:  James Monroe HILL, son of Asa & Elizabeth HILL, 13 Mar 1818.
      Huguenot Bible Records, Page 341
      Huguenot Bible Records, Page 341


    4. [S175] San Jacinto Museum, San Jacinto Museum of History, (http://www.sanjacinto-museum.org : 2017), accessed 23 Nov 2017), James Monroe Hill (Reliability: 4), 23 Nov 2017.
      James Monroe Hill - San Jacinto Museum Statistics
      James Monroe Hill - San Jacinto Museum Statistics


    5. [S176] Kemp Biographical Sketches, (San Jacinto Museum and Library. San Jacinto Museum and Library. http:\\www.sanjacinto-museum.org : 2017), "Veteran Biographies," San Jacinto Museum and Library (http:\\www.sanjacinto-museum.org : accessed 24 Nov 2017) (Reliability: 4), 24 Nov 2017.
      Page 112 of L. W. Kemp sketch manuscript, with some handwritten annotations.
      Kemp Biographical Sketch of Asa Hill
      Kemp Biographical Sketch of Asa Hill


    6. [S80] Huguenot Society Bible Records, Arthur Louis Finnell, editor, (1996; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2002.), 341. (Reliability: 4), 1 Oct 2017.
      HILL FAMILY BIBLE:  DEATHS:  James Monroe HILL, 14 Feb 1904, Austin, TX; aged 85yrs 11mos 1day.
      Huguenot Bible Records, Page 341
      Huguenot Bible Records, Page 341


    7. [S241] Kerr, Hugh and Lucy, Story, Althea Anne Lokey Kelly, (Dallas, Texas: Daughters of the Republic of Texas, 1993.), R929.20973., 21 of 31. (Reliability: 4), 11 Oct 2018.

    8. [S175] San Jacinto Museum, San Jacinto Museum of History, (http://www.sanjacinto-museum.org : 2017), accessed 23 Nov 2017), James Monroe Hill (Reliability: 4), 23 Nov 2017.
      James Monroe Hill - San Jacinto Museum Statistics
      James Monroe Hill - San Jacinto Museum Statistics


    9. [S75] Hill Family of Fayetteville, Typical Texians, George A. Hill, Immigration to Texas. (Reliability: 4), 2 Oct 2017.
      In 1834,  Asa Hill, accompanied by one son, William Carroll Andrew Jackson Hill, and his nephew, Isaac Lafayette Hill, journeyed to Texas, and selected a place for settlement in Austin's colony near Gay Hill, and then returned to Georgia to arrange for the removal of his family to Texas.

    10. [S175] San Jacinto Museum, San Jacinto Museum of History, (http://www.sanjacinto-museum.org : 2017), accessed 23 Nov 2017), James Monroe Hill (Reliability: 4), 23 Nov 2017.
      James Monroe Hill - San Jacinto Museum Statistics
      James Monroe Hill - San Jacinto Museum Statistics


    11. [S176] Kemp Biographical Sketches, (San Jacinto Museum and Library. San Jacinto Museum and Library. http:\\www.sanjacinto-museum.org : 2017), "Veteran Biographies," San Jacinto Museum and Library (http:\\www.sanjacinto-museum.org : accessed 24 Nov 2017) (Reliability: 4), 24 Nov 2017.
      Page 112 of L. W. Kemp sketch manuscript, with some handwritten annotations.
      Kemp Biographical Sketch of Asa Hill
      Kemp Biographical Sketch of Asa Hill


    12. [S78] Handbook of Texas Online, (https://tshaonline.org.), Joseph Blanton, "HILL, ASA COLLINSWORTH," online handbook (https://tshaonline.org : accessed 22 Sep 2019), http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fhiwv. (Reliability: 4), 22 Sep 2019.
      citing Handbook of Texas Online, Joseph E. Blanton, "HILL, ASA COLLINSWORTH," accessed September 19, 2019, http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fhiwv.

    13. [S175] San Jacinto Museum, San Jacinto Museum of History, (http://www.sanjacinto-museum.org : 2017), accessed 23 Nov 2017), James Monroe Hill (Reliability: 4), 23 Nov 2017.
      James Monroe Hill - San Jacinto Museum Statistics
      James Monroe Hill - San Jacinto Museum Statistics


    14. [S175] San Jacinto Museum, San Jacinto Museum of History, (http://www.sanjacinto-museum.org : 2017), accessed 23 Nov 2017), James Monroe Hill (Reliability: 4), 23 Nov 2017.
      James Monroe Hill - San Jacinto Museum Statistics
      James Monroe Hill - San Jacinto Museum Statistics


    15. [S175] San Jacinto Museum, San Jacinto Museum of History, (http://www.sanjacinto-museum.org : 2017), accessed 23 Nov 2017), James Monroe Hill (Reliability: 4), 23 Nov 2017.
      James Monroe Hill - San Jacinto Museum Statistics
      James Monroe Hill - San Jacinto Museum Statistics


    16. [S85] Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Julia Lee Sinks, "Rutersville College," (October 1898). (Reliability: 4), 3 Oct 2017.
      Rutersville College
      Rutersville College


    17. [S75] Hill Family of Fayetteville, Typical Texians, George A. Hill, 65-142, Hill and Kerr history in Fayetteville, Texas. (Reliability: 3), 28 Sep 2017.
      On September 14, 1843, James Monroe Hill married Jane Hallowell Kerr near the little town of Burton, and thereafter lived near Fayetteville for the next forty-one years, before removing to Austin, and here it was at the family homestead that my own father was born on March 23, 1853, and all of his brothers and sisters: James Leonidas Hill, John William Hill, Homer Barksdale Hill, George Alfred Hill, Lucy Amanda Hill, Mary Elizabeth Hill, Iola Jane Hill, Frank Webb Hill, Nola Hill.

    18. [S267] Census-Texas-Fayette-1870, Texas, Fayette, (http://www.ancestry.com: National Archives and Records Administration, 2009), M593, roll M593_1585, Fayetteville, p. 58, dwelling 351, family 351, J. M. Hill family, accessed 20 Jan 2018 (Reliability: 4), 20 Jan 2018.
      Dwelling Number: 351, Home in 1870: Precinct 2, Fayette, Texas, Hill, J. M., 52, farmer, Hill, Jane H., 46, keeps house, Hill, James, 25, merchant, Hill, John W., 23, lawyer, Hill, Homer B., 19, Hill, Alfred 17, Hill, Lucy 15, Hill, Mary E., 12, Hill, Frank, 7, Hill, Nola, 2, Moore, Texana, 18, servant, Moore, Joseph, 2, at home, Kerr, Lucy, 87.
      citing 1870 U.S. census, population schedules. NARA microfilm publication M593, 1,761 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.
      James Monroe Hill Family in 1870 Census
      James Monroe Hill Family in 1870 Census
      James' 1870 Census includes a white servant (Texana Moore), [apparently] her child Joseph, and James' mother, Lucy Kerr.

      Dwelling Number: 351, Home in 1870: Precinct 2, Fayette, Texas, Hill, J. M., 52, farmer, Hill, Jane H., 46, keeps house, Hill, James, 25, merchant, Hill, John W., 23, lawyer, Hill, Homer B., 19, Hill, Alfred 17, Hill, Lucy 15, Hill, Mary E., 12, Hill, Frank, 7, Hill, Nola, 2, Moore, Texana, 18, servant, Moore, Joseph, 2, at home, Kerr, Lucy, 87.


    19. [S267] Census-Texas-Fayette-1870, Texas, Fayette, (http://www.ancestry.com: National Archives and Records Administration, 2009), M593, roll M593_1585, Fayetteville, p. 58, dwelling 351, family 351, J. M. Hill family, accessed 20 Jan 2018 (Reliability: 4), 20 Jan 2018.
      Dwelling Number: 351, Home in 1870: Precinct 2, Fayette, Texas, Hill, J. M., 52, farmer, Hill, Jane H., 46, keeps house, Hill, James, 25, merchant, Hill, John W., 23, lawyer, Hill, Homer B., 19, Hill, Alfred 17, Hill, Lucy 15, Hill, Mary E., 12, Hill, Frank, 7, Hill, Nola, 2, Moore, Texana, 18, servant, Moore, Joseph, 2, at home, Kerr, Lucy, 87.
      citing 1870 U.S. census, population schedules. NARA microfilm publication M593, 1,761 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.
      James Monroe Hill Family in 1870 Census
      James Monroe Hill Family in 1870 Census
      James' 1870 Census includes a white servant (Texana Moore), [apparently] her child Joseph, and James' mother, Lucy Kerr.

      Dwelling Number: 351, Home in 1870: Precinct 2, Fayette, Texas, Hill, J. M., 52, farmer, Hill, Jane H., 46, keeps house, Hill, James, 25, merchant, Hill, John W., 23, lawyer, Hill, Homer B., 19, Hill, Alfred 17, Hill, Lucy 15, Hill, Mary E., 12, Hill, Frank, 7, Hill, Nola, 2, Moore, Texana, 18, servant, Moore, Joseph, 2, at home, Kerr, Lucy, 87.


    20. [S176] Kemp Biographical Sketches, (San Jacinto Museum and Library. San Jacinto Museum and Library. http:\\www.sanjacinto-museum.org : 2017), "Veteran Biographies," San Jacinto Museum and Library (http:\\www.sanjacinto-museum.org : accessed 24 Nov 2017) (Reliability: 4), 24 Nov 2017.
      Page 112 of L. W. Kemp sketch manuscript, with some handwritten annotations.
      Kemp Biographical Sketch of Asa Hill
      Kemp Biographical Sketch of Asa Hill


    21. [S102] Houston Chronical and Hearald, Texas. Houston., "Mrs. Kerr Dead," 22 Oct 1903, p. 3, col. 5. (Reliability: 4), 10 Oct 2017.
      Mrs. Kerr Dead.  Waelder, Texas, Oct 22.--Mrs. Sarena Kerr, known by her friends as Grandma Kerr, died of old age yesterday and her remains were interred in the Waelder cemetery today.  Deceased was the sister of James Monroe Hill of Austin, Texas, and Dr. J. C. C. Hill of Monterey, Mexico.
      'Mrs. Kerr Dead' -- Serena P. Hill Kerr Obituary
      "Mrs. Kerr Dead" -- Serena P. Hill Kerr Obituary


    22. [S579] Fayetteville Daily, Texas. Fayetteville., "Memoir of Colonel James Monroe Hill," 1904. (Reliability: 4), 2 Dec 2018.
      Original news clipping sent to Marie Brady by Sister ANdrea Harrington of the SIsters of Divine Providence, Fayetteville, TX on 9 Apr 1972.  Article was transcribed by Loy Burgess, Waco TX on 9 Mar 2003.
      James Monroe Hill, Obituary
      James Monroe Hill, Obituary
      Transcription from the original news clipping in the Fayetteville Daily.


    23. [S95] Sons Of DeWitt Colony Texas, (http://www.sonsofdewittcolony.org.), Wallace L. McKeehan, "Short Memoirs & Sketches from Old Texians," From San Jacinto Veteran James Monroe Hill 1894, online study (http://www.sonsofdewittcolony.org). (Reliability: 4), 8 Oct 2017.
      Excerpt of letter from James Monroe Hill re:  Battle of San Jacinto.

    24. [S166] U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, (Ancestry.com. http:\\www.ancestry.com : 1942.), (http:\\www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 Nov 2017), Mathew Loring U1510; citing United States, Selective Service System. Selective Service Registration Cards, World War II: Fourth Registration. Records of the Selective Service System, Record Group Number 147. National Archives and Records Administration. (Reliability: 4), 29 Nov 2017.
      Name Mattew Loring, Gender Male, Race White, Residence Age 59, Birth Date 4 Oct 1883, Birth Place Holy Cross, Iowa, USA, Residence Date 1942, Residence Place      Willow Springs, Wisconsin, USA.      
      Back - Mathew Loring WWII Draft Card
      Back - Mathew Loring WWII Draft Card
      Front - Mathew Loring WWII Draft Card
      Front - Mathew Loring WWII Draft Card


    25. [S75] Hill Family of Fayetteville, Typical Texians, George A. Hill, Hill's in the fight for Texas Independence. (Reliability: 4), 3 Oct 2017.

    26. [S241] Kerr, Hugh and Lucy, Story, Althea Anne Lokey Kelly, (Dallas, Texas: Daughters of the Republic of Texas, 1993.), R929.20973., 15. (Reliability: 4).

    27. [S78] Handbook of Texas Online, (https://tshaonline.org.), L. W. Kemp, "Texas Veterans Association," online handbook (https://tshaonline.org). (Reliability: 4), 22 Nov 2017.
      Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.

    28. [S75] Hill Family of Fayetteville, Typical Texians, George A. Hill, Marriage of Hill-Barksdale. (Reliability: 4), 10 Oct 2017.
      The family moved to Georgia about the years 1800, and founded the little town of Hillsboro, which was not far distant from the town of Fayetteville in Fayette County, and La Grange in Troup County, and it was there that he met and married Elizabeth Barksdale.

    29. [S675] Hill Family of Beersheba Springs, Tennessee, Willis, Ralph H., (Grundy County Historical Society. Grundy County History & Heritage. https://www.grundycountyhistory.org/ : 2019), "THE HILL FAMILY OF BEERSHEBA SPRINGS. TENNESSEE," Grundy County History & Heritage

       (https://www.grundycountyhistory.org/ : accessed 25 Sep 2019) (Reliability: 4), 25 Sep 2019.
      THE HILL FAMILY OF BEERSHEBA SPRINGS. TENNESSEE
      THE HILL FAMILY OF BEERSHEBA SPRINGS. TENNESSEE


    30. [S80] Huguenot Society Bible Records, Arthur Louis Finnell, editor, (1996; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2002.), 339-342. (Reliability: 4), 1 Oct 2017.
      Marriage Certificate:  James Monroe HILL, son of Asa & Elizabeth HILL and Jane Hallowell KERR, dau of Hugh & Lucy KERR at Hermitage, Washington Co, TN the 14 Sep 1843.
      Huguenot Bible Records, Page 339
      Huguenot Bible Records, Page 339


    31. [S80] Huguenot Society Bible Records, Arthur Louis Finnell, editor, (1996; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2002.), 339-342. (Reliability: 4), 1 Oct 2017.
      HILL FAMILY BIBLE:  Marriage Certificate:  James Monroe HILL, son of Asa & Elizabeth HILL and Jane Hallowell KERR, dau of Hugh & Lucy KERR at Hermitage, Washington Co, TN the 14 Sep 1843.
      Huguenot Bible Records, Page 339
      Huguenot Bible Records, Page 339


    32. [S175] San Jacinto Museum, San Jacinto Museum of History, (http://www.sanjacinto-museum.org : 2017), accessed 23 Nov 2017), James Monroe Hill (Reliability: 4), 23 Nov 2017.
      James Monroe Hill - San Jacinto Museum Statistics
      James Monroe Hill - San Jacinto Museum Statistics



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